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Title: A Novel Time-Interval Based Modulation for Large-Scale, Low-Power, Wide-Area-Networks
Wireless communication over long distances has become the bottleneck for battery-powered, large-scale deployments. Low-power protocols like Zigbee and Bluetooth Low Energy have limited communication range, whereas long-range communication strategies like cellular and satellite networks are power-hungry. Technologies that use narrow-band communication like LoRa, SigFox, and NB-IoT have low spectral efficiency, leading to scalability issues. The goal of this work is to develop a communication framework that is energy efficient, long-range, and scalable. We propose, design, and prototype WiChronos, a communication paradigm that encodes information in the time interval between two narrowband symbols to drastically reduce the energy consumption in a wide area network with large number of senders. We leverage the low data-rate and relaxed latency requirements of such applications to achieve the desired features identified above. We design and implement chirp spread spectrum transmitter and receiver using off-the-shelf components to send the narrowband symbols. Based on our prototype, WiChronos achieves an impressive 60% improvement in battery life compared to state-of-the-art LPWAN technologies in transmission of payloads less than 10 bytes at experimentally verified distances of over 4 km. We also show that more than 1,000 WiChronos senders can co-exist with less than 5% collision probability under low traffic conditions.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2034415 2142978
NSF-PAR ID:
10398498
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks
Volume:
18
Issue:
4
ISSN:
1550-4859
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 30
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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