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Title: Characterization of Design Brain States Over Time When Using Morphological Analysis and TRIZ
In this paper, we explored changes in brain states over time while designers were generating concepts. Participants either used morphological analysis or TRIZ to develop a design concept for two design tasks. While designing, participants’ brain activation in their prefrontal cortex (PFC) was monitored with a functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy machine. To identify variation in brain states, we analyzed changes in brain networks. Using k-mean clustering to classify brain networks for each task revealed four brain network patterns. While using morphological analysis, the occurrence of each pattern was similar along the design steps. For TRIZ, some brain states dominated depending on the design step. Drain states changes suggests that designers alternate engaging certain subregions of the PFC. This approach to studying brain behavior provides a more granular understanding of the evolution of design brain states over time. Findings add to the growing body of research exploring design neurocognition.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1929896
NSF-PAR ID:
10398981
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Editor(s):
Gero, John S.
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Design Computing and Cognition'22
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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