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Title: The unitary dependence theory for characterizing quantum circuits and states
Abstract

Most existing quantum algorithms are discovered accidentally or adapted from classical algorithms, and there is the need for a systematic theory to understand and design quantum circuits. Here we develop a unitary dependence theory to characterize the behaviors of quantum circuits and states in terms of how quantum gates manipulate qubits and determine their measurement probabilities. Compared to the conventional entanglement description of quantum circuits and states, the unitary dependence picture offers more practical information on the measurement and manipulation of qubits, easier generalization to many-qubit systems, and better robustness upon partitioning of the system. The unitary dependence theory can be applied to systematically understand existing quantum circuits and design new quantum algorithms.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10406512
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Publisher / Repository:
Nature Publishing Group
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Communications Physics
Volume:
6
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2399-3650
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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