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Title: Video: Dynamic fully immersive virtual reality of supersonic flows
In this video, we show high-fidelity numerical results of supersonic spatially-developing turbulent boundary layers (SDTBL) under strong concave and concave curvatures and Mach = 2.86. The selected numerical tool is Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) with high spatial/temporal resolution. The prescribed concave geometry is based on the experimental study by Donovan et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 259, 1-24, 1994). Turbulent inflow conditions are based on extracted data from a previous DNS over a flat plate (i.e., turbulence precursors). The comprehensive DNS information sheds important light on the transport phenomena inside turbulent boundary layers subject to strong deceleration or Adverse Pressure Gradient (APG) caused by concave walls as well as to strong acceleration or Favorable Pressure Gradient (FPG) caused by convex walls at different wall thermal conditions (i.e., cold, adiabatic and hot walls). In this opportunity, the selected scientific visualization tool is Virtual Reality (VR) by extracting vortex core iso-surfaces via the Q-criterion to convert them to a file format readable by the HTC Vive VR toolkit. The reader is invited to visit our Virtual Wind Tunnel (VWT) under a fully immersive environment for further details. The video is available at: https://gfm.aps.org/meetings/dfd-2022/6313a60c199e4c2da9a946bc  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2314303 1847241
NSF-PAR ID:
10415207
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
75th APS-DFD November 2022
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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