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Title: Cytosine monohydrate under mechanical stress
Nanoindentation performed with a conospherical tip on the (100) face of cytosine monohydrate (CM) revealed a highly anisotropic response over a range of loads. Post-indent atomic force microscopy images identified an asymmetric deformation response owing to the pro-chiral structure of the surface. Activation of low rugosity slip planes induces movement of π-stacks rather than their displacement along the 1-dimensional hydrogen bonded ribbon direction. Anisotropy arises because slip can only propagate to one side of the indent, as the tip itself imparts a barrier to slip on the preferred plane thereby forcing the activation of secondary slip systems and pileup. The anisotropic deformation is of interest in relation to previous work which proposed a ribbon–rotation model to account for the topotactic conversion between CM and the product of its dehydration. The asymmetry in the nanomechanical properties exhibited by CM provides further support for the rotational model put forth and also serves to underscore the inherent relationship between a hydrate's mechanical properties and its solid state dehydration mechanism.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2004435
NSF-PAR ID:
10418544
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
CrystEngComm
Volume:
25
Issue:
20
ISSN:
1466-8033
Page Range / eLocation ID:
3044 to 3050
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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