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Title: Model Order Reduction for Water Quality Dynamics
Abstract

A state‐space representation of water quality (WQ) dynamics describing disinfectant (e.g., chlorine) transport dynamics in drinking water distribution networks has been recently proposed. Such representation is a byproduct of space‐ and time‐discretization of the partial differential equations modeling transport dynamics. This results in a large state‐space dimension even for small networks with tens of nodes. Although such a state‐space model provides a model‐driven approach to predict WQ dynamics, incorporating it into model‐based control algorithms or state estimators for large networks is challenging and at times intractable. To that end, this paper investigates model order reduction (MOR) methods for WQ dynamics with the objective of performing post‐reduction feedback control. The presented investigation focuses on reducing state‐dimension by orders of magnitude, the stability of the MOR methods, and the application of these methods to model predictive control.

 
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Award ID(s):
2015658 2015603
NSF-PAR ID:
10418966
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
DOI PREFIX: 10.1029
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Water Resources Research
Volume:
58
Issue:
4
ISSN:
0043-1397
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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