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Title: CyberMAGICS: Cyber Training on Materials Genome Innovation for Computational Software for Future Engineers
Computing landscape is evolving rapidly. Exascale computers have arrived, which can perform 10^18 mathematical operations per second. At the same time, quantum supremacy has been demonstrated, where quantum computers have outperformed these fastest supercomputers for certain problems. Meanwhile, artificial intelligence (AI) is transforming every aspect of science and engineering. A highly anticipated application of the emerging nexus of exascale computing, quantum computing and AI is computational design of new materials with desired functionalities, which has been the elusive goal of the federal materials genome initiative. The rapid change in computing landscape resulting from these developments has not been matched by pedagogical developments needed to train the next generation of materials engineering cyberworkforce. This gap in curricula across colleges and universities offers a unique opportunity to create educational tools, enabling a decentralized training of cyberworkforce.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2118061
NSF-PAR ID:
10423332
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Division of Pacific South West Section (PSW)
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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