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Title: CyberMAGICS: Cyber Training on Materials Genome Innovation for Computational Software for Future Engineers
Computing landscape is evolving rapidly. Exascale computers have arrived, which can perform 10^18 mathematical operations per second. At the same time, quantum supremacy has been demonstrated, where quantum computers have outperformed these fastest supercomputers for certain problems. Meanwhile, artificial intelligence (AI) is transforming every aspect of science and engineering. A highly anticipated application of the emerging nexus of exascale computing, quantum computing and AI is computational design of new materials with desired functionalities, which has been the elusive goal of the federal materials genome initiative. The rapid change in computing landscape resulting from these developments has not been matched by pedagogical developments needed to train the next generation of materials engineering cyberworkforce. This gap in curricula across colleges and universities offers a unique opportunity to create educational tools, enabling a decentralized training of cyberworkforce. To achieve this, we have developed training modules for a new generation of quantum materials simulator, named AIQ-XMaS (AI and quantum-computing enabled exascale materials simulator), which integrates exascalable quantum, reactive and neural-network molecular dynamics simulations with unique AI and quantum-computing capabilities to study a wide range of materials and devices of high societal impact such as optoelectronics and health. As a singleentry access point to these training modules, we have also built a CyberMAGICS (cyber training on materials genome innovation for computational software) portal, which includes step-by-step instructions in Jupyter notebooks and associated tutorials, while providing online cloud service for those who do not have access to adequate computing platform. The modules are incorporated into our open-source AIQ-XMaS software suite as tutorial examples and are piloted in classroom and workshop settings to directly train many users at the University of Southern California (USC) and Howard University—one of the largest historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), with a strong focus on underrepresented groups. In this paper, we summarize these educational developments, including findings from the first CyberMAGICS Workshop for Underrepresented Groups, along with an introduction to the AIQ-XMaS software suite. Our training modules also include a new generation of open programming languages for exascale computing (e.g., OpenMP target) and quantum computing (e.g., Qiskit) used in our scalable simulation and AI engines that underlie AIQ-XMaS. Our training modules essentially support unique dual-degree opportunities at USC in the emerging exa-quantum-AI era: Ph.D. in science or engineering, concurrently with MS in computer science specialized in high-performance computing and simulations, MS in quantum information science or MS in materials engineering with machine learning. The developed modular cyber-training pedagogy is applicable to broad engineering education at large.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2118099
NSF-PAR ID:
10432270
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
American Society for Engineering Education Conference
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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