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Title: Connected Smart Home over Matter Protocol
Project Connected Home over IP, known as Matter, a unifying standard for the smart home, will begin formal device certification in late 2022. The standard will prioritize connectivity using short-range wireless communication protocols such as Wi-Fi, Thread, and Ethernet. The standard will also include emerging technologies such as Blockchain for device certification and security. In this paper, we rely on the Matter protocol to solve the long-standing heterogeneity problem in smart homes. This work presents a hardware Testbed built using development kits, as there is currently very few devices supporting Matter protocol. In addition, it presents a network architecture that automates smart homes to cloud services. The work is a simple and cheap way of developing a Testbed for automating smart homes that uses Matter protocol. The architecture lays the foundation for exploring security and privacy issues, data collection analysis, and data provenance in a smart home ecosystem built on Matter protocol.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1955231
NSF-PAR ID:
10429924
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2023 IEEE International Conference on Consumer Electronics (ICCE)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 7
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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