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Title: Scalable Adaptive PDE Solvers in Arbitrary Domains
Efficiently and accurately simulating partial differential equations (PDEs) in and around arbitrarily defined geometries, especially with high levels of adaptivity, has significant implications for different application domains. A key bottleneck in the above process is the fast construction of a ‘good’ adaptively-refined mesh. In this work, we present an efficient novel octree-based adaptive discretization approach capable of carving out arbitrarily shaped void regions from the parent domain: an essential requirement for fluid simulations around complex objects. Carving out objects produces an incomplete octree. We develop efficient top-down and bottom-up traversal methods to perform finite element computations on incomplete octrees. We validate the framework by (a) showing appropriate convergence analysis and (b) computing the drag coefficient for flow past a sphere for a wide range of Reynolds numbers (0(1-10 6 )) encompassing the drag crisis regime. Finally, we deploy the framework on a realistic geometry on a current project to evaluate COVID-19 transmission risk in classrooms.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1808652 2008772
NSF-PAR ID:
10431976
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
SC21: International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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