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Title: Electro-Chemo-Mechanical Challenges and Perspective in Lithium Metal Batteries
Abstract The development of next-generation batteries, utilizing electrodes with high capacities and power densities requires a comprehensive understanding and precise control of material interfaces and architectures. Electro-chemo-mechanics plays an integral role in the morphological evolution and stability of such complex interfaces. Volume changes in electrode materials and the chemical interactions of electrode/electrolyte interfaces result in nonuniform stress fields and structurally different interphases, fundamentally affecting the underlying transport and reaction kinetics. The origin of this mechanistic coupling and its implications on degradation is uniquely dependent on the interface characteristics. In this review, the distinct nature of chemo–mechanical coupling and failure mechanisms at solid–liquid interfaces and solid–solid interfaces is analyzed. For lithium metal electrodes, the critical role of surface/microstructural heterogeneities on the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) stability and dendrite growth in liquid electrolytes, and on the onset of contact loss and filament penetration with solid electrolytes is summarized. With respect to composite electrodes, key differences in the microstructure-coupled electro-chemo-mechanical attributes of intercalation- and conversion-based chemistries are delineated. Moving from liquid to solid electrolytes in such cathodes, we highlight the significant impact of solid–solid point contacts on transport/mechanical response, electrochemical performance, and failure modes such as particle cracking and delamination. Finally, we present our perspective on future research directions and opportunities to address the underlying electro-chemo-mechanical challenges for enabling next-generation lithium metal batteries.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2041499
NSF-PAR ID:
10436245
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Applied Mechanics Reviews
Volume:
75
Issue:
1
ISSN:
0003-6900
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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