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Title: Spatial parquet: a column file format for geospatial data lakes
Modern data analytics applications prefer to use column-storage formats due to their improved storage efficiency through encoding and compression. Parquet is the most popular file format for col- umn data storage that provides several of these benefits out of the box. However, geospatial data is not readily supported by Parquet. This paper introduces Spatial Parquet, a Parquet extension that efficiently supports geospatial data. Spatial Parquet inherits all the advantages of Parquet for non-spatial data, such as rich data types, compression, and column/row filtering. Additionally, it adds three new features to accommodate geospatial data. First, it introduces a geospatial data type that can encode all standard spatial geome- tries in a column format compatible with Parquet. Second, it adds a new lossless and efficient encoding method, termed FP-delta, that is customized to efficiently store geospatial coordinates stored in floating-point format. Third, it adds a light-weight spatial index that allows the reader to skip non-relevant parts of the file for increased read efficiency. Experiments on large-scale real data showed that Spatial Parquet can reduce the data size by a factor of three even without compression. Compression can further reduce the storage size. Additionally, Spatial Parquet can reduce the reading time by two orders of magnitude when the light-weight index is applied. This initial prototype can open new research directions to further improve geospatial data storage in column format.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2046236 1954644
NSF-PAR ID:
10438964
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Publisher / Repository:
ACM DL
Date Published:
Journal Name:
he 30th International Conference on Advances in Geographic Information Systems
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 4
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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