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Title: Spatial parquet: a column file format for geospatial data lakes
Modern data analytics applications prefer to use column-storage formats due to their improved storage efficiency through encoding and compression. Parquet is the most popular file format for col- umn data storage that provides several of these benefits out of the box. However, geospatial data is not readily supported by Parquet. This paper introduces Spatial Parquet, a Parquet extension that efficiently supports geospatial data. Spatial Parquet inherits all the advantages of Parquet for non-spatial data, such as rich data types, compression, and column/row filtering. Additionally, it adds three new features to accommodate geospatial data. First, it introduces a geospatial data type that can encode all standard spatial geome- tries in a column format compatible with Parquet. Second, it adds a new lossless and efficient encoding method, termed FP-delta, that is customized to efficiently store geospatial coordinates stored in floating-point format. Third, it adds a light-weight spatial index that allows the reader to skip non-relevant parts of the file for increased read efficiency. Experiments on large-scale real data showed that Spatial Parquet can reduce the data size by a factor of three even without compression. Compression can further reduce the storage size. Additionally, Spatial Parquet can reduce the reading time by two orders of magnitude when the light-weight index is applied. This initial prototype can open new research directions to further improve geospatial data storage in column format.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2046236 1954644
NSF-PAR ID:
10438964
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Publisher / Repository:
ACM DL
Date Published:
Journal Name:
he 30th International Conference on Advances in Geographic Information Systems
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 4
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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    File descriptions:

    Datasets are available in three spatial reference systems:

    1. HISDAC-ES_All_LAEA.zip: Raster data in Lambert Azimuthal Equal Area (LAEA) covering all Spanish territory.
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    3. HISDAC-ES_CanaryIslands_REGCAN.zip: Raster data in REGCAN-95, covering the Canary Islands only.
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    Source data:

    HISDAC-ES is derived from cadastral building footprint data, available from different authorities in Spain:

    • Araba province: https://geo.araba.eus/WFS_Katastroa?SERVICE=WFS&VERSION=1.1.0&REQUEST=GetCapabilities
    • Bizkaia province: https://web.bizkaia.eus/es/inspirebizkaia
    • Gipuzkoa province: https://b5m.gipuzkoa.eus/web5000/es/utilidades/inspire/edificios/
    • Navarra region: https://inspire.navarra.es/services/BU/wfs
    • Other regions: http://www.catastro.minhap.es/INSPIRE/buildings/ES.SDGC.bu.atom.xml
    • Data source of municipality polygons: Centro Nacional de Información Geográfica (https://centrodedescargas.cnig.es/CentroDescargas/index.jsp)

    Technical notes:

    Gridded data

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    ./region_projection_theme/hisdac_es_theme_variable_version_resolution[m][_year].tif

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    • Comunidad autónoma (CA_CODE): 01
    • Province (PROV_CODE): 04
    • LAU code: 04001 (province + municipality code)
     
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The breast corpus subset should be released by November 2021. By December 2021 we should also release the unannotated FCCC data. We are currently annotating urinary tract data as well. We expect to release about 5,600 processed TUH slides in this subset. We have an additional 53,000 unprocessed TUH slides digitized. Corpora of this size will stimulate the development of a new generation of deep learning technology. In clinical settings where resources are limited, an assistive diagnoses model could support pathologists’ workload and even help prioritize suspected cancerous cases. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This material is supported by the National Science Foundation under grants nos. CNS-1726188 and 1925494. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation. REFERENCES [1] N. Shawki et al., “The Temple University Digital Pathology Corpus,” in Signal Processing in Medicine and Biology: Emerging Trends in Research and Applications, 1st ed., I. Obeid, I. Selesnick, and J. Picone, Eds. New York City, New York, USA: Springer, 2020, pp. 67 104. https://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783030368432. [2] J. Picone, T. Farkas, I. Obeid, and Y. Persidsky, “MRI: High Performance Digital Pathology Using Big Data and Machine Learning.” Major Research Instrumentation (MRI), Division of Computer and Network Systems, Award No. 1726188, January 1, 2018 – December 31, 2021. https://www. isip.piconepress.com/projects/nsf_dpath/. [3] A. Gulati et al., “Conformer: Convolution-augmented Transformer for Speech Recognition,” in Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association (INTERSPEECH), 2020, pp. 5036-5040. https://doi.org/10.21437/interspeech.2020-3015. [4] C.-J. Wu et al., “Machine Learning at Facebook: Understanding Inference at the Edge,” in Proceedings of the IEEE International Symposium on High Performance Computer Architecture (HPCA), 2019, pp. 331–344. https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8675201. [5] I. Caswell and B. Liang, “Recent Advances in Google Translate,” Google AI Blog: The latest from Google Research, 2020. [Online]. Available: https://ai.googleblog.com/2020/06/recent-advances-in-google-translate.html. [Accessed: 01-Aug-2021]. [6] V. Khalkhali, N. Shawki, V. Shah, M. Golmohammadi, I. Obeid, and J. Picone, “Low Latency Real-Time Seizure Detection Using Transfer Deep Learning,” in Proceedings of the IEEE Signal Processing in Medicine and Biology Symposium (SPMB), 2021, pp. 1 7. https://www.isip. piconepress.com/publications/conference_proceedings/2021/ieee_spmb/eeg_transfer_learning/. [7] J. Picone, T. Farkas, I. Obeid, and Y. Persidsky, “MRI: High Performance Digital Pathology Using Big Data and Machine Learning,” Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 2020. https://www.isip.piconepress.com/publications/reports/2020/nsf/mri_dpath/. [8] I. Hunt, S. Husain, J. Simons, I. Obeid, and J. Picone, “Recent Advances in the Temple University Digital Pathology Corpus,” in Proceedings of the IEEE Signal Processing in Medicine and Biology Symposium (SPMB), 2019, pp. 1–4. https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/9037859. [9] A. P. Martinez, C. Cohen, K. Z. Hanley, and X. (Bill) Li, “Estrogen Receptor and Cytokeratin 5 Are Reliable Markers to Separate Usual Ductal Hyperplasia From Atypical Ductal Hyperplasia and Low-Grade Ductal Carcinoma In Situ,” Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med., vol. 140, no. 7, pp. 686–689, Apr. 2016. https://doi.org/10.5858/arpa.2015-0238-OA. 
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