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Title: Assessing the impacts of anthropogenic drainage structures on hydrologic connectivity using high‐resolution digital elevation models
Abstract

Delineating accurate flowlines using digital elevation models is a critical step for overland flow modeling. However, extracting surface flowlines from high‐resolution digital elevation models (HRDEMs) can be biased, partly due to the absence of information on the locations of anthropogenic drainage structures (ADS) such as bridges and culverts. Without the ADS, the roads may act as “digital dams” that prevent accurate delineation of flowlines. However, it is unclear what variables for terrain‐based hydrologic modeling can be used to mitigate the effect of “digital dams.” This study assessed the impacts of ADS locations, spatial resolution, depression processing methods, and flow direction algorithms on hydrologic connectivity in an agrarian landscape of Nebraska. The assessment was conducted based on the offset distances between modeled drainage crossings and actual ADS on the road. Results suggested that: (a) stream burning in combination with the D8 or D‐Infinity flow direction algorithm is the best option for modeling surface flowlines from HRDEMs in an agrarian landscape; (b) increasing the HRDEM resolution was found significant for facilitating accurate drainage crossing near ADS locations; and (c) D8 and D‐Infinity flow direction algorithms resulted in similar patterns of drainage crossing at ADS locations. This research is expected to result in improved parameter settings for HRDEMs‐based hydrologic modeling.

 
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Award ID(s):
1951741
NSF-PAR ID:
10445367
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley-Blackwell
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Transactions in GIS
Volume:
25
Issue:
5
ISSN:
1361-1682
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 2596-2611
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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