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Title: Meter-scale plasma waveguides for multi-GeV laser wakefield acceleration
We present results from two new techniques for the generation of meter-scale, low density (∼1017 cm−3 on axis) plasma waveguides, the “two-Bessel” technique, and the “self-waveguiding” technique. Plasma waveguides of this density and length range are needed for demonstration of a ∼10 GeV laser wakefield accelerator module, key for future staging for a ∼TeV lepton collider. Both techniques require the use of high quality ultrashort pulse Bessel beams to efficiently and uniformly ionize hydrogen gas in meter-scale supersonic gas jets via optical field ionization. We review these two techniques, describe our meter-scale gas jets, and present a new method for correction of optical aberrations in Bessel beams. Finally, we briefly present results from recent experiments employing one of our techniques, demonstrating quasi-monoenergetic acceleration of ∼5 GeV electron bunches in 20 cm long, low density plasma waveguides.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2010511
NSF-PAR ID:
10447274
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Physics of Plasmas
Volume:
29
Issue:
7
ISSN:
1070-664X
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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