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Title: Stabilizing Effect of High Pore Fluid Pressure on Fault Growth During Drained Deformation
Key Points High pore fluid pressure stabilizes fault propagation in porous sandstone deformed under drained conditions Slow faulting was associated with pervasive microcracking and diffuse shear bands only in samples deformed sufficiently slow Pervasive subcritical cracking enables slow faulting at high pore fluid pressure under drained conditions at the sample scale  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1761912 2218314
NSF-PAR ID:
10465072
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth
Volume:
128
Issue:
8
ISSN:
2169-9313
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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