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Title: Cultural capital: A contributing factor in the success of high achieving, low income engineering students
Due to the continued lack of diversity in engineering and the limited research on socioeconomic status, the objective of this project was to understand how high-achieving, low-income engineering students utilized cultural capital to carve successful academic pathways. This study used a qualitative inductive approach to address the research question: how did high-achieving low-income engineering students use cultural capital to succeed academically during COVID- 19? Results showed that participants utilized social, navigational, and aspirational capital to succeed during the pandemic. The results expand understanding of this sample of students and their resolve to succeed academically using cultural capital.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1834034
NSF-PAR ID:
10466344
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Date Published:
Journal Name:
International Conference on Urban Education
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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