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Title: Multifunctional Acoustic Device Based on a Phononic Crystal with Independently Controlled Asymmetric Rotating Rods
A reconfigurable phononic crystal (PnC) is proposed where elastic properties can be modulated by rotation of asymmetric solid scatterers immersed in water. The scatterers are metallic rods with a cross section of 120◦ circular sector. Orientation of each rod is independently controlled by an external electric motor that allows continuous variation of the local scattering parameters and dispersion of sound in the entire crystal. Due to asymmetry of the scatterers, the crystal band structure possesses highly anisotropic band gaps. Synchronous rotation of all the scatterers by a definite angle changes the regime of reflection to the regime of transmission and vice versa. The same mechanically tunable structure functions as a gradient index medium by incremental, angular reorientation of rods along both row and column, and, subsequently, can serve as a tunable acoustic lens, an acoustic beam splitter, and finally an acoustic beam steerer.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1741677
NSF-PAR ID:
10470179
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
American Physical Society
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Physical Review Applied
Volume:
19
Issue:
5
ISSN:
2331-7019
Page Range / eLocation ID:
054008-1-13
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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