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Title: Side‐Chain Chemistry Governs Hierarchical Order of Charge‐Complementary β‐sheet Peptide Coassemblies
Abstract

Self‐assembly of proteinaceous biomolecules into functional materials with ordered structures that span length scales is common in nature yet remains a challenge with designer peptides under ambient conditions. This report demonstrates how charged side‐chain chemistry affects the hierarchical co‐assembly of a family of charge‐complementary β‐sheet‐forming peptide pairs known as CATCH(X+/Y−) at physiologic pH and ionic strength in water. In a concentration‐dependent manner, the CATCH(6K+) (Ac‐KQKFKFKFKQK‐Am) and CATCH(6D−) (Ac‐DQDFDFDFDQD‐Am) pair formed either β‐sheet‐rich microspheres or β‐sheet‐rich gels with a micron‐scale plate‐like morphology, which were not observed with other CATCH(X+/Y−) pairs. This hierarchical order was disrupted by replacing D with E, which increased fibril twisting. Replacing K with R, or mutating the N‐ and C‐terminal amino acids in CATCH(6K+) and CATCH(6D−) to Qs, increased observed co‐assembly kinetics, which also disrupted hierarchical order. Due to the ambient assembly conditions, active CATCH(6K+)‐green fluorescent protein fusions could be incorporated into the β‐sheet plates and microspheres formed by the CATCH(6K+/6D−) pair, demonstrating the potential to endow functionality.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10475139
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Volume:
62
Issue:
51
ISSN:
1433-7851
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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    Self‐assembly of proteinaceous biomolecules into functional materials with ordered structures that span length scales is common in nature yet remains a challenge with designer peptides under ambient conditions. This report demonstrates how charged side‐chain chemistry affects the hierarchical co‐assembly of a family of charge‐complementary β‐sheet‐forming peptide pairs known as CATCH(X+/Y−) at physiologic pH and ionic strength in water. In a concentration‐dependent manner, the CATCH(6K+) (Ac‐KQKFKFKFKQK‐Am) and CATCH(6D−) (Ac‐DQDFDFDFDQD‐Am) pair formed either β‐sheet‐rich microspheres or β‐sheet‐rich gels with a micron‐scale plate‐like morphology, which were not observed with other CATCH(X+/Y−) pairs. This hierarchical order was disrupted by replacing D with E, which increased fibril twisting. Replacing K with R, or mutating the N‐ and C‐terminal amino acids in CATCH(6K+) and CATCH(6D−) to Qs, increased observed co‐assembly kinetics, which also disrupted hierarchical order. Due to the ambient assembly conditions, active CATCH(6K+)‐green fluorescent protein fusions could be incorporated into the β‐sheet plates and microspheres formed by the CATCH(6K+/6D−) pair, demonstrating the potential to endow functionality.

     
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