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This content will become publicly available on October 3, 2024

Title: SKS Polarization Anomalies Due to the Coriolis Force
ABSTRACT

The Earth’s Coriolis force has been well-known to impact surface waves and normal modes, which is essential to accurately interpret these waves. However, the Coriolis force on body waves has been assumed to be negligible and mostly ignored. It has been previously shown that the Coriolis force impacts polarizations of shear waves, whereas the wavefronts remain unaffected. We expand on the potential influences of Earth’s Coriolis force on shear-wave polarization measurements by conducting 3D numerical simulations for elastic waves generated by earthquake and explosive sources in a radially symmetric, and 3D mantle and crustal models. The Coriolis force can produce polarization anomalies of mantle shear waves up to 7° and core phases, such as SKS and SKKS, up to 4°. Uncorrected shear-wave polarizations due to the Coriolis force can cause an additional source of error (5°–10° in fast direction, and 0.2–0.3 s delay time depending on the method and seismic phase), inaccurate interpretation of station misalignments, and imprecise estimates of the core–mantle boundary topography. We show how to correct for the Coriolis force on teleseismic shear waves using 1D ray tracing for well-isolated phases. We recommend the use of full waveform simulations to accurately account for earthquake sources parameters, poorly isolated phases that could include interfering phase arrivals within the measurement time window, and the effect of the Coriolis force on the polarizations of shear waves.

 
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Award ID(s):
2026931
NSF-PAR ID:
10475631
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America
ISSN:
0037-1106
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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