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Title: Electrodeposition Stability Landscape for Solid–Solid Interfaces
Abstract

As solid‐state batteries (SSBs) with lithium (Li) metal anodes gain increasing traction as promising next‐generation energy storage systems, a fundamental understanding of coupled electro‐chemo‐mechanical interactions is essential to design stable solid‐solid interfaces. Notably, uneven electrodeposition at the Li metal/solid electrolyte (SE) interface arising from intrinsic electrochemical and mechanical heterogeneities remains a significant challenge. In this work, the thermodynamic origins of mechanics‐coupled reaction kinetics at the Li/SE interface are investigated and its implications on electrodeposition stability are unveiled. It is established that the mechanics‐driven energetic contribution to the free energy landscape of the Li deposition/dissolution redox reaction has a critical influence on the interface stability. The study presents the competing effects of mechanical and electrical overpotential on the reaction distribution, and demarcates the regimes under which stress interactions can be tailored to enable stable electrodeposition. It is revealed that different degrees of mechanics contribution to the forward (dissolution) and backward (deposition) reaction rates result in widely varying stability regimes, and the mechanics‐coupled kinetics scenario exhibited by the Li/SE interface is shown to depend strongly on the thermodynamic and mechanical properties of the SE. This work highlights the importance of discerning the underpinning nature of electro‐chemo‐mechanical coupling toward achieving stable solid/solid interfaces in SSBs.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10480042
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Advanced Science
ISSN:
2198-3844
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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