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Title: Cultivating a culture of inclusivity in heliophysics

A large number of heliophysicists from across career levels, institution types, and job titles came together to support a poster at Heliophysics 2050 and the position papers for the 2024 Heliophysics decadal survey titled “Cultivating a Culture of Inclusivity in Heliophysics,” “The Importance of Policies: It’s not just a pipeline problem,” and “Mentorship within Heliophysics.” While writing these position papers, the number of people who privately shareddisturbing stories and experiences of bullying and harassmentwas shocking. The number of people who privately expressed howburned outthey were was staggering. The number of people who privately spoke about how theyconsidered leaving the field for their and their family’s healthwas astounding. And for as much good there is in our community, it is still atoxic environmentfor many. If we fail to do something now, our field will continue to suffer. While acknowledging the ongoing growth that we as individuals must work toward, we call on our colleagues to join us in working on organizational, group, and personal levels toward a truly inclusive culture, for the wellbeing of our colleagues and the success of our field. This work includes policies, processes, and commitments to promote:accountabilityfor bad actors;financial securitythrough removing the constant anxiety about funding;prioritizationof mental health and community through removing constant deadlines and constant last-minute requests;a collaborative culturerather than a hyper-competitive one; anda community where people can thrive as whole personsand do not have to give up a healthy or well-rounded life to succeed.

 
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Award ID(s):
1663770
NSF-PAR ID:
10480363
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Frontiers
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Physics
Volume:
11
ISSN:
2296-424X
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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