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Title: Don’t Just Prune by Magnitude! Your Mask Topology is Another Secret Weapon
Recent years have witnessed significant progress in understanding the relationship between the connectivity of a deep network's architecture as a graph, and the network's performance. A few prior arts connected deep architectures to expander graphs or Ramanujan graphs, and particularly,[7] demonstrated the use of such graph connectivity measures with ranking and relative performance of various obtained sparse sub-networks (i.e. models with prune masks) without the need for training. However, no prior work explicitly explores the role of parameters in the graph's connectivity, making the graph-based understanding of prune masks and the magnitude/gradient-based pruning practice isolated from one another. This paper strives to fill in this gap, by analyzing the Weighted Spectral Gap of Ramanujan structures in sparse neural networks and investigates its correlation with final performance. We specifically examine the evolution of sparse structures under a popular dynamic sparse-to-sparse network training scheme, and intriguingly find that the generated random topologies inherently maximize Ramanujan graphs. We also identify a strong correlation between masks, performance, and the weighted spectral gap. Leveraging this observation, we propose to construct a new "full-spectrum coordinate'' aiming to comprehensively characterize a sparse neural network's promise. Concretely, it consists of the classical Ramanujan's gap (structure), our proposed weighted spectral gap (parameters), and the constituent nested regular graphs within. In this new coordinate system, a sparse subnetwork's L2-distance from its original initialization is found to have nearly linear correlated with its performance. Eventually, we apply this unified perspective to develop a new actionable pruning method, by sampling sparse masks to maximize the L2-coordinate distance. Our method can be augmented with the "pruning at initialization" (PaI) method, and significantly outperforms existing PaI methods. With only a few iterations of training (e.g 500 iterations), we can get LTH-comparable performance as that yielded via "pruning after training", significantly saving pre-training costs. Codes can be found at: https://github.com/VITA-Group/FullSpectrum-PAI.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2133861
NSF-PAR ID:
10480846
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NeurIPS 2023)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Advances in neural information processing systems
ISSN:
1049-5258
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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