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Title: The role of surface hydroxyls in the entropy-driven adsorption and spillover of H2 on Au/TiO2 catalysts
Hydrogen spillover involves the migration of H atom equivalents from metal nanoparticles to a support. While well documented, H spillover is poorly understood and largely unquantified. Here we measure weak, reversible H2 adsorption on Au/TiO2 catalysts, and extract the surface concentration of spilled-over hydrogen. The spillover species (H*) is best described as a loosely coupled proton/electron pair distributed across the titania surface hydroxyls. In stark contrast to traditional gas adsorption systems, H* adsorption increases with temperature. This unexpected adsorption behaviour has two origins. First, entropically favourable adsorption results from high proton mobility and configurational surface entropy. Second, the number of spillover sites increases with temperature, due to increasing hydroxyl acid–base equilibrium constants. Increased H* adsorption correlates with the associated changes in titania surface zwitterion concentration. This study provides a quantitative assessment of how hydroxyl surface chemistry impacts spillover thermodynamics, and contributes to the general understanding of spillover phenomena.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1803769 2102430
NSF-PAR ID:
10480858
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Springer
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Nature Catalysis
Volume:
6
Issue:
8
ISSN:
2520-1158
Page Range / eLocation ID:
710 to 719
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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