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This content will become publicly available on September 1, 2024

Title: COMPASS App: A Patient-centered Physiological based Pain Assessment System

Chronic pain patients lack at-home pain assessment and management tools. The existing chronic-pain mobile applications are either solely relying on self-report pain levels or restricted to formal clinical settings. Our app, abbreviated from an NSF-funded project entitled Novel Computational Methods for Continuous Objective Multimodal Pain Assessment Sensing System (COMPASS), is a multi-dimensional pain app that collects physiological signals to predict objective pain levels and trace daily at-home activities by incorporating a daily check-in section. We conducted a usability test with 33 healthy participants under pain conditions. The results provided initial support for the validity of the signals in predicting internalizing pain levels among the participants. With further development and testing, we believe the COMPASS app system has the potential to be used by both patients and clinicians as an additional tool to better assess and manage pain, especially for mobile healthcare applications.

 
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Award ID(s):
1838621
NSF-PAR ID:
10481400
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting
Volume:
67
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2169-5067
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1361 to 1367
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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