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Title: Angular Gyrus Responses Show Joint Statistical Dependence with Brain Regions Selective for Different Categories
Category selectivity is a fundamental principle of organization of perceptual brain regions. Human occipitotemporal cortex is subdivided into areas that respond preferentially to faces, bodies, artifacts, and scenes. However, observers need to combine information about objects from different categories to form a coherent understanding of the world. How is this multicategory information encoded in the brain? Studying the multivariate interactions between brain regions of male and female human subjects with fMRI and artificial neural networks, we found that the angular gyrus shows joint statistical dependence with multiple category-selective regions. Adjacent regions show effects for the combination of scenes and each other category, suggesting that scenes provide a context to combine information about the world. Additional analyses revealed a cortical map of areas that encode information across different subsets of categories, indicating that multicategory information is not encoded in a single centralized location, but in multiple distinct brain regions.

SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTMany cognitive tasks require combining information about entities from different categories. However, visual information about different categorical objects is processed by separate, specialized brain regions. How is the joint representation from multiple category-selective regions implemented in the brain? Using fMRI movie data and state-of-the-art multivariate statistical dependence based on artificial neural networks, we identified the angular gyrus encoding responses across face-, body-, artifact-, and scene-selective regions. Further, we showed a cortical map of areas that encode information across different subsets of categories. These findings suggest that multicategory information is not encoded in a single centralized location, but at multiple cortical sites which might contribute to distinct cognitive functions, offering insights to understand integration in a variety of domains.  more » « less

Award ID(s):
1943862
NSF-PAR ID:
10482160
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Journal of Neuroscience
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The Journal of Neuroscience
Volume:
43
Issue:
15
ISSN:
0270-6474
Page Range / eLocation ID:
2756 to 2766
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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