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Title: Scintillating Bubble Chambers for Rare Event Searches

The Scintillating Bubble Chamber (SBC) collaboration is developing liquid-noble bubble chambers for the detection of sub-keV nuclear recoils. These detectors benefit from the electron recoil rejection inherent in moderately-superheated bubble chambers with the addition of energy reconstruction provided from the scintillation signal. The ability to measure low-energy nuclear recoils allows the search for GeV-scale dark matter and the measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering on argon from MeV-scale reactor antineutrinos. The first physics-scale detector, SBC-LAr10, is in the commissioning phase at Fermilab, where extensive engineering and calibration studies will be performed. In parallel, a functionally identical low-background version, SBC-SNOLAB, is being built for a dark matter search underground at SNOLAB. SBC-SNOLAB, with a 10 kg-yr exposure, will have sensitivity to a dark matter–nucleon cross section of 2×10−42 cm2 at 1 GeV/c2 dark matter mass, and future detectors could reach the boundary of the argon neutrino fog with a tonne-yr exposure. In addition, the deployment of an SBC detector at a nuclear reactor could enable neutrino physics investigations including measurements of the weak mixing angle and searches for sterile neutrinos, the neutrino magnetic moment, and the light Z’ gauge boson.

 
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Award ID(s):
1828609 1936432
NSF-PAR ID:
10485946
Author(s) / Creator(s):
Editor(s):
Baracchini, Elisabetta
Publisher / Repository:
MDPI
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Universe
Volume:
9
Issue:
8
ISSN:
2218-1997
Page Range / eLocation ID:
346
Subject(s) / Keyword(s):
["dark matter","neutrinos","bubble chambers","metastable fluids","liquid argon"]
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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