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This content will become publicly available on October 14, 2024

Title: AI through the Eyes of Gen Z: Setting a Research Agenda for Emerging Technologies that Empower Our Future Generation
Artificial intelligence (AI) underpins virtually every experience that we have—from search and social media to generative AI and immersive social virtual reality (SVR). For Generation Z, there is no before AI. As adults, we must humble ourselves to the notion that AI is shaping youths’ world in ways that we don’t understand and we need to listen to them about their lived experiences. We invite researchers from academia and industry to participate in a workshop with youth activists to set the agenda for research into how AI-driven emerging technologies affect youth and how to address these challenges. This reflective workshop will amplify youth voices and empower youth and researchers to set an agenda. As part of the workshop, youth activists will participate in a panel and steer the conversation around the agenda for future research. All will participate in group research agenda setting activities to reflect on their experiences with AI technologies and consider ways to tackle these challenges.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2333207
NSF-PAR ID:
10486664
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
ACM
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Workshop at the 2023 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW 2023)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
518 to 521
Format(s):
Medium: X
Location:
Minneapolis MN USA
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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