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Title: Curb Allocation and Pick-Up Drop-Off Aggregation for a Shared Autonomous Vehicle Fleet

Advances in information technologies and vehicle automation have birthed new transportation services, including shared autonomous vehicles (SAVs). Shared autonomous vehicles are on-demand self-driving taxis, with flexible routes and schedules, able to replace personal vehicles for many trips in the near future. The siting and density of pick-up and drop-off (PUDO) points for SAVs, much like bus stops, can be key in planning SAV fleet operations, since PUDOs impact SAV demand, route choices, passenger wait times, and network congestion. Unlike traditional human-driven taxis and ride-hailing vehicles like Lyft and Uber, SAVs are unlikely to engage in quasi-legal procedures, like double parking or fire hydrant pick-ups. In congested settings, like central business districts (CBD) or airport curbs, SAVs and others will not be allowed to pick up and drop off passengers wherever they like. This paper uses an agent-based simulation to model the impact of different PUDO locations and densities in the Austin, Texas CBD, where land values are highest and curb spaces are coveted. In this paper 18 scenarios were tested, varying PUDO density, fleet size and fare price. The results show that for a given fare price and fleet size, PUDO spacing (e.g., one block vs. three blocks) has significant impact on ridership, vehicle-miles travelled, vehicle occupancy, and revenue. A good fleet size to serve the region’s 80 core square miles is 4000 SAVs, charging a $1 fare per mile of travel distance, and with PUDOs spaced three blocks of distance apart from each other in the CBD.

 
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Award ID(s):
2137274 1650483
NSF-PAR ID:
10494392
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Publisher / Repository:
Sage Publications
Date Published:
Journal Name:
International Regional Science Review
Volume:
47
Issue:
2
ISSN:
0160-0176
Page Range / eLocation ID:
131 to 158
Subject(s) / Keyword(s):
pickup and drop-off locations shared autonomous vehicles autonomous taxis ridesharing stations dynamic ride-sharing curb management
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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