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Title: CSDMS Data Components: data–model integration tools for Earth surface processes modeling

Abstract. Progress in better understanding and modeling Earth surface systems requires an ongoing integration of data and numerical models. Advances are currently hampered by technical barriers that inhibit finding, accessing, and executing modeling software with related datasets. We propose a design framework for Data Components, which are software packages that provide access to particular research datasets or types of data. Because they use a standard interface based on the Basic Model Interface (BMI), Data Components can function as plug-and-play components within modeling frameworks to facilitate seamless data–model integration. To illustrate the design and potential applications of Data Components and their advantages, we present several case studies in Earth surface processes analysis and modeling. The results demonstrate that the Data Component design provides a consistent and efficient way to access heterogeneous datasets from multiple sources and to seamlessly integrate them with various models. This design supports the creation of open data–model integration workflows that can be discovered, accessed, and reproduced through online data sharing platforms, which promotes data reuse and improves research transparency and reproducibility.

 
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Award ID(s):
1844181
NSF-PAR ID:
10495580
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Editor(s):
Wickert, A.
Publisher / Repository:
GMD
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Geoscientific Model Development
Volume:
17
Issue:
5
ISSN:
1991-9603
Page Range / eLocation ID:
2165 to 2185
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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