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Title: "It disrupts power dynamics": Co-Design Process as a Space for Intergenerational Learning with Distributed Expertise
This paper examines co-design as a space for collaborative learning with distributed expertise across generations and roles. We address a fundamental need in co-design spaces: to develop and surface expertise relevant to the design task across a team. We examine how knowledge building is experienced in a design process that has asymmetric expertise among youth, educators, and researchers. We used co-design to engage educators and youth in collaboration towards designing an Artificial Intelligence unit that centers equity and justice. We structured for joint inquiry to facilitate collective learning. We conducted interviews with participants to understand how they experienced codesign. We found our approach allowed for collaborative learning and interactivity among participants with different kinds of expertise.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2019805
NSF-PAR ID:
10497791
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
The International Conference of the Learning Sciences 2022
Date Published:
Journal Name:
In Proceedings of The International Conference of the Learning Sciences 2022
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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