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Title: Drosophila germ granules are assembled from protein components through different modes of competing interactions with the multi‐domain Tudor protein

Membraneless organelles are RNA–protein assemblies which have been implicated in post‐transcriptional control. Germ cells form membraneless organelles referred to as germ granules, which contain conserved proteins including Tudor domain‐containing scaffold polypeptides and their partner proteins that interact with Tudor domains. Here, we show that inDrosophila, different germ granule proteins associate with the multi‐domain Tudor protein using different numbers of Tudor domains. Furthermore, these proteins compete for interaction with Tudorin vitroand, surprisingly, partition to distinct and poorly overlapping clusters in germ granulesin vivo. This partition results in minimization of the competition. Our data suggest that Tudor forms structurally different configurations with different partner proteins which dictate different biophysical properties and phase separation parameters within the same granule.

 
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Award ID(s):
2130162 1715541
NSF-PAR ID:
10499475
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
FEBS Letters
Volume:
598
Issue:
7
ISSN:
0014-5793
Format(s):
Medium: X Size: p. 774-786
Size(s):
["p. 774-786"]
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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