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Title: Alignment between student epistemological views and experiences with course structures in introductory physics: A case study
Designing physics courses that support students' activation and development of expert-like physics epistemologies is a significant goal of Physics Education Research. However, very little research has focused on how physics students' interactions with course structures resonate with different epistemological views. As part of a course redesign effort to increase student success in introductory physics, we interviewed introductory physics students about their experiences with course structures and their learning and belonging beliefs. We present here a case from this broader data corpus in which a student, Robyn, discusses his epistemological views of physics problem solving and his experiences with physics lectures, office hours, and discussion sections. We find that Robyn's physics epistemology manifests consistently across his interactions with each of these different course structures, suggesting a possible resonance between students' beliefs and their experiences with course structures and the value of further investigation into the potential merits of comprehensive course design.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2235516
NSF-PAR ID:
10502606
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ;
Editor(s):
Jones, Dyan; Ryan, Qing X.; Pawl, Andrew
Publisher / Repository:
American Association of Physics Teachers
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Physics Education Research Conference
ISSN:
1539-9028
Page Range / eLocation ID:
260 to 265
Format(s):
Medium: X
Location:
Sacramento, CA
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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