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Title: Nonproportionality of NaI(Tl) scintillation detector for dark matter search experiments
Abstract

We present a comprehensive study of the nonproportionality of NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors within the context of dark matter search experiments. Our investigation, which integrates COSINE-100 data with supplementary$$\gamma $$γspectroscopy, measures light yields across diverse energy levels from full-energy$$\gamma $$γpeaks produced by the decays of various isotopes. These$$\gamma $$γpeaks of interest were produced by decays supported by both long and short-lived isotopes. Analyzing peaks from decays supported only by short-lived isotopes presented a unique challenge due to their limited statistics and overlapping energies, which was overcome by long-term data collection and a time-dependent analysis. A key achievement is the direct measurement of the 0.87 keV light yield, resulting from the cascade following electron capture decay of$$\mathrm {^{22}Na}$$22Nafrom internal contamination. This measurement, previously accessible only indirectly, deepens our understanding of NaI(Tl) scintillator behavior in the region of interest for dark matter searches. This study holds substantial implications for background modeling and the interpretation of dark matter signals in NaI(Tl) experiments.

 
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NSF-PAR ID:
10506149
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; more » ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; « less
Publisher / Repository:
Springer Science + Business Media
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The European Physical Journal C
Volume:
84
Issue:
5
ISSN:
1434-6052
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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