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Title: A User Experience Study of MeetingMayhem: a Web-Based Game to Teach Adversarial Thinking
The game is intended for students who do not necessarily have any prior background in computer science. Assuming the role of agents, two players exchange messages over a network to try to agree on a meeting time and location, while an adversary interferes with their plan. Following the Dolev-Yao model, the adversary has full control of the network: they can see all messages and modify, block, or forward them. We designed the game as a web application, where groups of three students play the game, taking turns being the adversary. The adversary is a legitimate communicant on the network, and the agents do not know who is the other agent and who is the adversary. Through gameplay, we expect students to be able to (1) identify the dangers of communicating through a computer network, (2) describe the capabilities of a Dolev-Yao adversary, and (3) apply three cryptographic primitives: symmetric encryption, asymmetric encryption, and digital signatures. We conducted surveys, focus groups, and interviews to evaluate the effectiveness of the game in achieving the learning objectives. The game helped students achieve the first two learning objectives, as well as using symmetric encryption. We found that students enjoyed playing MeetingMayhem. We are revising MeetingMayhem to improve its user interface and to better support students to learn about asymmetric encryption and digital signatures.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2138921
NSF-PAR ID:
10507952
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
ACM
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the ACM conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE),
Subject(s) / Keyword(s):
cybersecurity education educational game network security
Format(s):
Medium: X
Location:
Milan, Italy
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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