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Title: VQAttack: Transferable Adversarial Attacks on Visual Question Answering via Pre-trained Models

Visual Question Answering (VQA) is a fundamental task in computer vision and natural language process fields. Although the “pre-training & finetuning” learning paradigm significantly improves the VQA performance, the adversarial robustness of such a learning paradigm has not been explored. In this paper, we delve into a new problem: using a pre-trained multimodal source model to create adversarial image-text pairs and then transferring them to attack the target VQA models. Correspondingly, we propose a novel VQATTACK model, which can iteratively generate both im- age and text perturbations with the designed modules: the large language model (LLM)-enhanced image attack and the cross-modal joint attack module. At each iteration, the LLM-enhanced image attack module first optimizes the latent representation-based loss to generate feature-level image perturbations. Then it incorporates an LLM to further enhance the image perturbations by optimizing the designed masked answer anti-recovery loss. The cross-modal joint attack module will be triggered at a specific iteration, which updates the image and text perturbations sequentially. Notably, the text perturbation updates are based on both the learned gradients in the word embedding space and word synonym-based substitution. Experimental results on two VQA datasets with five validated models demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed VQATTACK in the transferable attack setting, compared with state-of-the-art baselines. This work revealsa significant blind spot in the “pre-training & fine-tuning” paradigm on VQA tasks. The source code can be found in the link https://github.com/ericyinyzy/VQAttack.

 
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Award ID(s):
2406572 2212323 2405136 1951729
NSF-PAR ID:
10509528
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publisher / Repository:
AAAI
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence
Volume:
38
Issue:
7
ISSN:
2159-5399
Page Range / eLocation ID:
6755 to 6763
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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