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Title: Citizen science for IceCube: Name that Neutrino
Abstract

Name that Neutrinois a citizen science project where volunteers aid in classification of events for the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, an immense particle detector at the geographic South Pole. From March 2023 to September 2023, volunteers did classifications of videos produced from simulated data of both neutrino signal and background interactions.Name that Neutrinoobtained more than 128,000 classifications by over 1800 registered volunteers that were compared to results obtained by a deep neural network machine-learning algorithm. Possible improvements for bothName that Neutrinoand the deep neural network are discussed.

 
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Award ID(s):
2310051 2209445
NSF-PAR ID:
10515657
Author(s) / Creator(s):
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Publisher / Repository:
Springer Science + Business Media
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The European Physical Journal Plus
Volume:
139
Issue:
6
ISSN:
2190-5444
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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