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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 16, 2025
  2. System operators are often interested in extracting different feature streams from multi-dimensional data streams; and reporting their distributions at regular intervals, including the heavy hitters that contribute to the tail portion of the feature distribution. Satisfying these requirements to increase data rates with limited resources is challenging. This paper presents the design and implementation of Panakos that makes the best use of available resources to report a given feature's distribution accurately, its tail contributors, and other stream statistics (e.g., cardinality, entropy, etc.). Our key idea is to leverage the skewness inherent to most feature streams in the real world. We leverage this skewness by disentangling the feature stream into hot, warm, and cold items based on their feature values. We then use different data structures for tracking objects in each category. Panakos provides solid theoretical guarantees and achieves high performance for various tasks. We have implemented Panakos on both software and hardware and compared Panakos to other state-of-the-art sketches using synthetic and real-world datasets. The experimental results demonstrate that Panakos often achieves one order of magnitude better accuracy than the state-of-the-art solutions for a given memory budget. 
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  3. Linear sketches have been widely adopted to process fast data streams, and they can be used to accurately answer frequency estimation, approximate top K items, and summarize data distributions. When data are sensitive, it is desirable to provide privacy guarantees for linear sketches to preserve private information while delivering useful results with theoretical bounds. We show that linear sketches can ensure privacy and maintain their unique properties with a small amount of noise added at initialization. From the differentially private linear sketches, we showcase that the state-of-the-art quantile sketch in the turnstile model can also be private and maintain high performance. Experiments further demonstrate that our proposed differentially private sketches are quantitatively and qualitatively similar to noise-free sketches with high utilization on synthetic and real datasets. 
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  4. Today's large-scale data management systems need to address distributed applications' confidentiality and scalability requirements among a set of collaborative enterprises. This paper presents Qanaat , a scalable multi-enterprise permissioned blockchain system that guarantees the confidentiality of enterprises in collaboration workflows. Qanaat presents data collections that enable any subset of enterprises involved in a collaboration workflow to keep their collaboration private from other enterprises. A transaction ordering scheme is also presented to enforce only the necessary and sufficient constraints on transaction order to guarantee data consistency. Furthermore, Qanaat supports data consistency across collaboration workflows where an enterprise can participate in different collaboration workflows with different sets of enterprises. Finally, Qanaat presents a suite of consensus protocols to support intra-shard and cross-shard transactions within or across enterprises. 
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  5. Butler, Kevin R. ; Thomas, Kurt (Ed.)
  6. Given a private string q and a remote server that holds a set of public documents D, how can one of the K most relevant documents to q in D be selected and viewed without anyone (not even the server) learning anything about q or the document? This is the oblivious document ranking and retrieval problem. In this paper, we describe Coeus, a system that solves this problem. At a high level, Coeus composes two cryptographic primitives: secure matrix-vector product for scoring document relevance using the widely-used term frequency-inverse document frequency (tf-idf) method, and private information retrieval (PIR) for obliviously retrieving documents. However, Coeus reduces the time to run these protocols, thereby improving the user-perceived latency, which is a key performance metric. Coeus first reduces the PIR overhead by separating out private metadata retrieval from document retrieval, and it then scales secure matrix-vector product to tf-idf matrices with several hundred billion elements through a series of novel cryptographic refinements. For a corpus of English Wikipedia containing 5 million documents, a keyword dictionary with 64K keywords, and on a cluster of 143 machines on AWS, Coeus enables a user to obliviously rank and retrieve a document in 3.9 seconds---a 24x improvement over a baseline system. 
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  7. The unique features of blockchains such as immutability, transparency, provenance, and authenticity have been used by many large-scale data management systems to deploy a wide range of distributed applications including supply chain management, healthcare, and crowdworking in permissioned settings. Unlike permissionless settings, e.g., Bitcoin, where the network is public, and anyone can participate without a specific identity, a permissioned blockchain system consists of a set of known, identified nodes that might not fully trust each other. While the characteristics of permissioned blockchains are appealing to a wide range of largescale data management systems, these systems, have to satisfy four main requirements: confidentiality, verifiability, performance, and scalability. Various approaches have been developed in industry and academia to satisfy these requirements with varying assumptions and costs. The focus of this tutorial is on presenting many of these techniques while highlighting the trade-offs among them. We demonstrate the practicality of such techniques in real-life by presenting three different applications, i.e., supply chain management, large-scale databases, and multi-platform crowdworking environments, and show how those techniques can be utilized to meet the requirements of such applications 
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  8. null (Ed.)
  9. Metadata from voice calls, such as the knowledge of who is communicating with whom, contains rich information about people’s lives. Indeed, it is a prime target for powerful adversaries such as nation states. Existing systems that hide voice call metadata either require trusted intermediaries in the network or scale to only tens of users. This paper describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of Addra, the first system for voice communication that hides metadata over fully untrusted infrastructure and scales to tens of thousands of users. At a high level, Addra follows a template in which callers and callees deposit and retrieve messages from private mailboxes hosted at an untrusted server. However, Addra improves message latency in this architecture, which is a key performance metric for voice calls. First, it enables a caller to push a message to a callee in two hops, using a new way of assigning mailboxes to users that resembles how a post office assigns PO boxes to its customers. Second, it innovates on the underlying cryptographic machinery and constructs a new private information retrieval scheme, FastPIR, that reduces the time to process oblivious access requests for mailboxes. An evaluation of Addra on a cluster of 80 machines on AWS demonstrates that it can serve 32K users with a 99-th percentile message latency of 726 ms—a 7✕ improvement over a prior system for text messaging in the same threat model. 
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  10. null (Ed.)