skip to main content

Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Anderson, Thomas"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Blasius, Bernd (Ed.)
  2. High development velocity is critical for modern systems. This is especially true for Linux file systems which are seeing increased pressure from new storage devices and new demands on storage systems. However, high velocity Linux kernel development is challenging due to the ease of introducing bugs, the difficulty of testing and debugging, and the lack of support for redeployment without service disruption. Existing approaches to high-velocity development of file systems for Linux have major downsides, such as the high performance penalty for FUSE file systems, slowing the deployment cycle for new file system functionality. We propose Bento, a framework for high velocity development of Linux kernel file systems. It enables file systems written in safe Rust to be installed in the Linux kernel, with errors largely sandboxed to the file system. Bento file systems can be replaced with no disruption to running applications, allowing daily or weekly upgrades in a cloud server setting. Bento also supports userspace debugging. We implement a simple file system using Bento and show that it performs similarly to VFS-native ext4 on a variety of benchmarks and outperforms a FUSE version by 7x on 'git clone'. We also show that we can dynamically add file provenancemore »tracking to a running kernel file system with only 15ms of service interruption.« less
  3. Brophy, Caroline (Ed.)
  4. The adoption of low latency persistent memory modules (PMMs) upends the long-established model of remote storage for distributed file systems. Instead, by colocating computation with PMM storage, we can provide applications with much higher IO performance, sub-second application failover, and strong consistency. To demonstrate this, we built the Assise distributed file system, based on a persistent, replicated coherence protocol that manages client-local PMM as a linearizable and crash-recoverable cache between applications and slower (and possibly remote) storage. Assise maximizes locality for all file IO by carrying out IO on process-local, socket-local, and client-local PMM whenever possible. Assise minimizes coherence overhead by maintaining consistency at IO operation granularity, rather than at fixed block sizes. We compare Assise to Ceph/BlueStore, NFS, and Octopus on a cluster with Intel Optane DC PMMs and SSDs for common cloud applications and benchmarks, such as LevelDB, Postfix, and FileBench. We find that Assise improves write latency up to 22x, throughput up to 56x, fail-over time up to 103x, and scales up to 6x better than its counterparts, while providing stronger consistency semantics.