skip to main content

Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Bockelman, Brian"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. We introduce a new end-to-end software environment that enables experimentation with using SciTokens for capability-based authorization in scientific computing. This set of interconnected Docker containers enables science projects to gain experience with the SciTokens model prior to adoption. It is a product of our SciAuth project, which supports the adoption of the SciTokens model through community engagement, support for coordinated adoption of community standards, assistance with software integration, security analysis and threat modeling, training, and workforce development.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 10, 2023
  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available November 1, 2022
  3. Biscarat, C. ; Campana, S. ; Hegner, B. ; Roiser, S. ; Rovelli, C.I. ; Stewart, G.A. (Ed.)
    The processing needs for the High Luminosity (HL) upgrade for the LHC require the CMS collaboration to harness the computational power available on non-CMS resources, such as High-Performance Computing centers (HPCs). These sites often limit the external network connectivity of their computational nodes. In this paper we describe a strategy in which all network connections of CMS jobs inside a facility are routed to a single point of external network connectivity using a Virtual Private Network (VPN) server by creating virtual network interfaces in the computational nodes. We show that when the computational nodes and the host running the VPN server have the namespaces capability enabled, the setup can run entirely on user space with no other root permissions required. The VPN server host may be a privileged node inside the facility configured for outside network access, or an external service that the nodes are allowed to contact. When namespaces are not enabled at the client side, then the setup falls back to using a SOCKS server instead of virtual network interfaces. We demonstrate the strategy by executing CMS Monte Carlo production requests on opportunistic non-CMS resources at the University of Notre Dame. For these jobs, cvmfs support is testedmore »via fusermount (cvmfsexec), and the native fuse module.« less
  4. Biscarat, C. ; Campana, S. ; Hegner, B. ; Roiser, S. ; Rovelli, C.I. ; Stewart, G.A. (Ed.)
    The High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider provides a data challenge. The amount of data recorded from the experiments and transported to hundreds of sites will see a thirty fold increase in annual data volume. A systematic approach to contrast the performance of different Third Party Copy (TPC) transfer protocols arises. Two contenders, XRootD-HTTPS and the GridFTP are evaluated in their performance for transferring files from one server to another over 100Gbps interfaces. The benchmarking is done by scheduling pods on the Pacific Research Platform Kubernetes cluster to ensure reproducible and repeatable results. This opens a future pathway for network testing of any TPC transfer protocol.
  5. Biscarat, C. ; Campana, S. ; Hegner, B. ; Roiser, S. ; Rovelli, C.I. ; Stewart, G.A. (Ed.)
    Data analysis in HEP has often relied on batch systems and event loops; users are given a non-interactive interface to computing resources and consider data event-by-event. The “Coffea-casa” prototype analysis facility is an effort to provide users with alternate mechanisms to access computing resources and enable new programming paradigms. Instead of the command-line interface and asynchronous batch access, a notebook-based web interface and interactive computing is provided. Instead of writing event loops, the columnbased Coffea library is used. In this paper, we describe the architectural components of the facility, the services offered to end users, and how it integrates into a larger ecosystem for data access and authentication.
  6. Biscarat, C. ; Campana, S. ; Hegner, B. ; Roiser, S. ; Rovelli, C.I. ; Stewart, G.A. (Ed.)
    The intelligent Data Delivery Service (iDDS) has been developed to cope with the huge increase of computing and storage resource usage in the coming LHC data taking. iDDS has been designed to intelligently orchestrate workflow and data management systems, decoupling data pre-processing, delivery, and main processing in various workflows. It is an experiment-agnostic service around a workflow-oriented structure to work with existing and emerging use cases in ATLAS and other experiments. Here we will present the motivation for iDDS, its design schema and architecture, use cases and current status, and plans for the future.
  7. Doglioni, C. ; Kim, D. ; Stewart, G.A. ; Silvestris, L. ; Jackson, P. ; Kamleh, W. (Ed.)
    WLCG relies on the network as a critical part of its infrastructure and therefore needs to guarantee effective network usage and prompt detection and resolution of any network issues including connection failures, congestion and traffic routing. The OSG Networking Area, in partnership with WLCG, is focused on being the primary source of networking information for its partners and constituents. It was established to ensure sites and experiments can better understand and fix networking issues, while providing an analytics platform that aggregates network monitoring data with higher level workload and data transfer services. This has been facilitated by the global network of the perfSONAR instances that have been commissioned and are operated in collaboration with WLCG Network Throughput Working Group. An additional important update is the inclusion of the newly funded NSF project SAND (Service Analytics and Network Diagnosis) which is focusing on network analytics. This paper describes the current state of the network measurement and analytics platform and summarises the activities taken by the working group and our collaborators. This includes the progress being made in providing higher level analytics, alerting and alarming from the rich set of network metrics we are gathering.
  8. Doglioni, C. ; Kim, D. ; Stewart, G.A. ; Silvestris, L. ; Jackson, P. ; Kamleh, W. (Ed.)
    A general problem faced by opportunistic users computing on the grid is that delivering cycles is simpler than delivering data to those cycles. In this project XRootD caches are placed on the internet backbone to create a content delivery network. Scientific workflows in the domains of high energy physics, gravitational waves, and others profit from this delivery network to increases CPU efficiency while decreasing network bandwidth use.