skip to main content


Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Chen, Xilun"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Real-time decision making has acquired increasing interest as a means to efficiently operating complex systems. The main challenge in achieving real-time decision making is to understand how to develop next generation optimization procedures that can work efficiently using: (i) real data coming from a large complex dynamical system, (ii) simulation models available that reproduce the system dynamics. While this paper focuses on a different problem with respect to the literature in RL, the methods proposed in this paper can be used as a support in a sequential setting as well. The result of this work is the new Generalized Ordinal Learning Framework (GOLF) that utilizes simulated data interpreting them as low accuracy information to be intelligently collected offline and utilized online once the scenario is revealed to the user. GOLF supports real-time decision making on complex dynamical systems once a specific scenario is realized. We show preliminary results of the proposed techniques that motivate the authors in further pursuing the presented ideas. 
    more » « less
  2. Modern NLP applications have enjoyed a great boost utilizing neural networks models. Such deep neural models, however, are not applicable to most human languages due to the lack of annotated training data for various NLP tasks. Cross-lingual transfer learning (CLTL) is a viable method for building NLP models for a low-resource target language by leveraging labeled data from other (source) languages. In this work, we focus on the multilingual transfer setting where training data in multiple source languages is leveraged to further boost target language performance. Unlike most existing methods that rely only on language-invariant features for CLTL, our approach coherently utilizes both language invariant and language-specific features at instance level. Our model leverages adversarial networks to learn language-invariant features, and mixture-of-experts models to dynamically exploit the similarity between the target language and each individual source language1. This enables our model to learn effectively what to share between various languages in the multilingual setup. Moreover, when coupled with unsupervised multilingual embeddings, our model can operate in a zero-resource setting where neither target language training data nor cross-lingual resources are available. Our model achieves significant performance gains over prior art, as shown in an extensive set of experiments over multiple text classification and sequence tagging. 
    more » « less
  3. Many text classification tasks are known to be highly domain-dependent. Unfortunately, the availability of training data can vary drastically across domains. Worse still, for some domains there may not be any annotated data at all. In this work, we propose a multinomial adversarial network (MAN) to tackle the text classification problem in this real-world multidomain setting (MDTC). We provide theoretical justifications for the MAN framework, proving that different instances of MANs are essentially minimizers of various f-divergence metrics (Ali and Silvey, 1966) among multiple probability distributions. MANs are thus a theoretically sound generalization of traditional adversarial networks that discriminate over two distributions. More specifically, for the MDTC task, MAN learns features that are invariant across multiple domains by resorting to its ability to reduce the divergence among the feature distributions of each domain. We present experimental results showing that MANs significantly outperform the prior art on the MDTC task. We also show that MANs achieve state-of-the-art performance for domains with no labeled data. 
    more » « less
  4. Multilingual Word Embeddings (MWEs) represent words from multiple languages in a single distributional vector space. Unsupervised MWE (UMWE) methods acquire multilingual embeddings without cross-lingual supervision, which is a significant advantage over traditional supervised approaches and opens many new possibilities for low-resource languages. Prior art for learning UMWEs, however, merely relies on a number of independently trained Unsupervised Bilingual Word Embeddings (UBWEs) to obtain multilingual embeddings. These methods fail to leverage the interdependencies that exist among many languages. To address this shortcoming, we propose a fully unsupervised framework for learning MWEs1 that directly exploits the relations between all language pairs. Our model substantially outperforms previous approaches in the experiments on multilingual word translation and cross-lingual word similarity. In addition, our model even beats supervised approaches trained with cross-lingual resources. 
    more » « less
  5. Dynamic topic models (DTM) are commonly used for mining latent topics in evolving web corpora. In this paper, we note that a major limitation of the conventional DTM based models is that they assume a predetermined and fixed scale of topics. In reality, however, topics may have varying spans and topics of multiple scales can co-exist in a single web or social media data stream. Therefore, DTMs that assume a fixed epoch length may not be able to effectively capture latent topics and thus negatively affect accuracy. In this paper, we propose a Multi-Scale Dynamic Topic Model (MS-DTM) and a complementary Incremental Multi-Scale Dynamic Topic Model (IMS-DTM) inference method that can be used to capture latent topics and their dynamics simultaneously, at different scales. In this model, topic specific feature distributions are generated based on a multi-scale feature distribution of the previous epochs; moreover, multiple scales of the current epoch are analyzed together through a novel multi-scale incremental Gibbs sampling technique. We show that the proposed model significantly improves efficiency and effectiveness compared to the single scale dynamic DTMs and prior models that consider only multiple scales of the past.

     
    more » « less
  6. In recent years great success has been achieved in sentiment classification for English, thanks in part to the availability of copious annotated resources. Unfortunately, most languages do not enjoy such an abundance of labeled data. To tackle the sentiment classification problem in low-resource languages without adequate annotated data, we propose an Adversarial Deep Averaging Network (ADAN) to transfer the knowledge learned from labeled data on a resource-rich source language to low-resource languages where only unlabeled data exist. ADAN has two discriminative branches: a sentiment classifier and an adversarial language discriminator. Both branches take input from a shared feature extractor to learn hidden representations that are simultaneously indicative for the classification task and invariant across languages. Experiments on Chinese and Arabic sentiment classification demonstrate that ADAN significantly outperforms state-of-the-art systems. 
    more » « less
  7. Data- and model-driven computer simulations are increasingly critical in many application domains. Yet, several critical data challenges remain in obtaining and leveraging simulations in decision making. Simulations may track 100s of parameters, spanning multiple layers and spatial-temporal frames, affected by complex inter-dependent dynamic processes. Moreover, due to the large numbers of unknowns, decision makers usually need to generate ensembles of stochastic realizations, requiring 10s-1000s of individual simulation instances. The situation on the ground evolves unpredictably, requiring continuously adaptive simulation ensembles. We introduce the DataStorm framework for simulation ensemble management, and demonstrate its DataStorm-FE data- and decision-flow and coordination engine for creating and maintaining coupled, multi-model simulation ensembles. DataStorm-FE enables end-to-end ensemble planning and optimization, including parameter-space sampling, output aggregation and alignment, and state and provenance data management, to improve the overall simulation process. It also aims to work efficiently, producing results while working within a limited simulation budget, and incorporates a multivariate, spatiotemporal data browser to empower decision-making based on these improved results.

     
    more » « less