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Creators/Authors contains: "Deng, Xinwei"

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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 1, 2024
  2. In group anagram games, players cooperate to form words by sharing letters that they are initially given. The aim is to form as many words as possible as a group, within five minutes. Players take several different actions: requesting letters from their neighbors, replying to letter requests, and forming words. Agent-based models (ABMs) for the game compute likelihoods of each player’s next action, which contain uncertainty, as they are estimated from experimental data. We adopt a Bayesian approach as a natural means of quantifying uncertainty, to enhance the ABM for the group anagram game. Specifically, a Bayesian nonparametric clustering method is used to group player behaviors into different clusters without pre-specifying the number of clusters. Bayesian multi nominal regression is adopted to model the transition probabilities among different actions of the players in the ABM. We describe the methodology and the benefits of it, and perform agent-based simulations of the game.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available December 11, 2023
  3. Heterogeneous player behaviors are commonly observed in games. It is important to quantify and visualize these heterogeneities in order to understand collective behaviors. Our work focuses on developing a Bayesian approach for uncertainty visualization in a model of networked anagram games. In these games, team members collectively form as many words as possible by sharing letters with their neighbors in a network. Heterogeneous player behaviors include great differences in numbers of words formed and the amount of cooperation among networked neighbors. Our Bayesian approach provides meaningful insights for inferring worst, average, and best player performance within behavioral clusters, overcoming previous model shortcomings. These inferences are integrated into a simulation framework to understand the implications of model uncertainty and players' heterogeneous behaviors.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available November 8, 2023
  4. Free, publicly-accessible full text available November 1, 2023
  5. Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 1, 2023
  6. In a networked anagram game, each team member is given a set of letters and members collectively form as many words as possible. They can share letters through a communication network in assisting their neighbors in forming words. There is variability in behaviors of players, e.g., there can be large differences in numbers of letter requests, of replies to letter requests, and of words formed among players. Therefore, it is of great importance to understand uncertainty and variability in player behaviors. In this work, we propose versatile uncertainty quantification (VUQ) of behaviors for modeling the networked anagram game. Specifically, the proposed methods focus on building contrastive models of game player behaviors that quantify player actions in terms of worst, average, and best performance. Moreover, we construct agent-based models and perform agent-based simulations using these VUQ methods to evaluate the model building methodology and understand the impact of uncertainty. We believe that this approach is applicable to other networked games.
  7. In a group anagram game, players are provided letters to form as many words as possible. They can also request letters from their neighbors and reply to letter requests. Currently, a single agent-based model is produced from all experimental data, with dependence only on number of neighbors. In this work, we build, exercise, and evaluate enhanced agent behavior models for networked group anagram games under an uncertainty quantification framework. Specifically, we cluster game data for players based on their skill levels (forming words, requesting letters, and replying to requests), perform multinomial logistic regression for transition probabilities, and quantify uncertainty within each cluster. The result of this process is a model where players are assigned different numbers of neighbors and different skill levels in the game. We conduct simulations of ego agents with neighbors to demonstrate the efficacy of our proposed methods.