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  1. In this paper, we study an unmanned-aerial-vehicle (UAV) based full-duplex (FD) multi-user communication network, where a UAV is deployed as a multiple-input–multiple-output (MIMO) FD base station (BS) to serve multiple FD users on the ground. We propose a multi-objective optimization framework which considers two desirable objective functions, namely sum uplink (UL) rate maximization and sum downlink (DL) rate maximization while providing quality-of-service to all the users in the communication network. A novel resource allocation multi-objective-optimization-problem (MOOP) is designed which optimizes the downlink beamformer, the beamwidth angle, and the 3D position of the UAV, and also the UL power of the FD users. The formulated MOOP is a non-convex problem which is generally intractable. To handle the MOOP, a weighted Tchebycheff method is proposed, which converts the problem to the single-objective-optimization-problem (SOOP). Further, an alternative optimization approach is used, where SOOP is converted in to multiple sub-problems and optimization variables are operated alternatively. The numerical results show a trade-off region between sum UL and sum DL rate, and also validate that the considered FD system provides substantial improvement over traditional HD systems.
    Free, publicly-accessible full text available February 1, 2023
  2. Full-duplex (FD) communication in many-antenna base stations (BSs) is hampered by self-interference (SI). This is because a FD node’s transmitting signal generates significant interference to its own receiver. Recent works have shown that it is possible to reduce/eliminate this SI in fully digital many-antenna systems, e.g., through transmit beamforming by using some spatial degrees of freedom to reduce SI instead of increasing the beamforming gain. On a parallel front, hybrid beamforming has recently emerged as a radio architecture that uses multiple antennas per FR chain. This can significantly reduce the cost of the end device (e.g., BS) but may also reduce the capacity or SI reduction gains of a fully digital radio system. This is because a fully digital radio architecture can change both the amplitude and phase of the wireless signal and send different data streams from each antenna element. Our goal in this paper is to quantify the performance gap between these two radio architectures in terms of SI cancellation and system capacity, particularly in multi-user MIMO setups. To do so, we experimentally compare the performance of a state-of-the-art fully digital many antenna FD solution to a hybrid beamforming architecture and compare the corresponding performance metrics leveraging amore »fully programmable many-antenna testbed and collecting over-the-air wireless channel data. We show that SI cancellation through beam design on a hybrid beamforming radio architecture can achieve capacity within 16% of that of a fully digital architecture. The performance gap further shrinks with a higher number of quantization bits in the hybrid beamforming system.« less
  3. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) often lack the size, weight, and power to support large antenna arrays or a large number of radio chains. Despite such limitations, emerging applications that require the use of swarms, where UAVs form a pattern and coordinate towards a common goal, must have the capability to transmit in any direction in three-dimensional (3D) space from moment to moment. In this work, we design a measurement study to evaluate the role of antenna polarization diversity on UAV systems communicating in arbitrary 3D space. To do so, we construct flight patterns where one transmitting UAV is hovering at a high altitude (80 m) and a receiving UAV hovers at 114 different positions that span 3D space at a radial distance of approximately 20 m along equally-spaced elevation and azimuth angles. To understand the role of diverse antenna polarizations, both UAVs have a horizontally-mounted antenna and a vertically-mounted antenna-each attached to a dedicated radio chain-creating four wireless channels. With this measurement campaign, we seek to understand how to optimally select an antenna orientation and quantify the gains in such selections.