skip to main content

Attention:

The NSF Public Access Repository (NSF-PAR) system and access will be unavailable from 5:00 PM ET until 11:00 PM ET on Friday, June 21 due to maintenance. We apologize for the inconvenience.


Search for: All records

Creators/Authors contains: "Khanduri, Prashant"

Note: When clicking on a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) number, you will be taken to an external site maintained by the publisher. Some full text articles may not yet be available without a charge during the embargo (administrative interval).
What is a DOI Number?

Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.

  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 23, 2024
  2. Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 23, 2024
  3. Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 23, 2024
  4. Free, publicly-accessible full text available July 23, 2024
  5. In this work, we consider a distributed online convex optimization problem, with time-varying (potentially adversarial) constraints. A set of nodes, jointly aim to minimize a global objective function, which is the sum of local convex functions. The objective and constraint functions are revealed locally to the nodes, at each time, after taking an action. Naturally, the constraints cannot be instantaneously satisfied. Therefore, we reformulate the problem to satisfy these constraints in the long term. To this end, we propose a distributed primal-dual mirror descent-based algorithm, in which the primal and dual updates are carried out locally at all the nodes. This is followed by sharing and mixing of the primal variables by the local nodes via communication with the immediate neighbors. To quantify the performance of the proposed algorithm, we utilize the challenging, but more realistic metrics of dynamic regret and fit. Dynamic regret measures the cumulative loss incurred by the algorithm compared to the best dynamic strategy, while fit measures the long term cumulative constraint violations. Without assuming the restrictive Slater’s conditions, we show that the proposed algorithm achieves sublinear regret and fit under mild, commonly used assumptions. 
    more » « less