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  1. Abstract

    The baryonic Tully–Fisher relation (BTFR) has applications in galaxy evolution as a test bed for the galaxy–halo connection and in observational cosmology as a redshift-independent secondary distance indicator. This analysis leverages the 31,000+ galaxy Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (AreciboL-band Feed Array) Survey (ALFALFA) sample—which provides redshifts, velocity widths, and Hicontent for a large number of gas-bearing galaxies in the local universe—to fit and test an extensive local universe BTFR. The fiducial relation is fit using a 3000-galaxy subsample of ALFALFA, and is shown to be consistent with the full sample. This BTFR is designed to be as inclusive of ALFALFA and comparable samples as possible. Velocity widths measured via an automated method andMbproxies extracted from survey data can be uniformly and efficiently measured for other samples, giving this analysis broad applicability. We also investigate the role of sample demographics in determining the best-fit relation. We find that the best-fit relations are changed significantly by changes to the sample mass range and to second order by changes to mass sampling, gas fraction, different stellar mass and velocity width measurements. We use a subset of ALFALFA with demographics that reflect the full sample to measure a robust BTFR slope of 3.30 ± 0.06. We apply this relation and estimate source distances, finding general agreement with flow-model distances as well as average distance uncertainties of ∼0.17 dex for the full ALFALFA sample. We demonstrate the utility of these distance estimates by applying them to a sample of sources in the Virgo vicinity, recovering signatures of infall consistent with previous work.

     
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  2. Abstract Virgo is the nearest galaxy cluster; it is thus ideal for studies of galaxy evolution in dense environments in the local universe. It is embedded in a complex filamentary network of galaxies and groups, which represents the skeleton of the large-scale Laniakea supercluster. Here we assemble a comprehensive catalog of galaxies extending up to ∼12 virial radii in projection from Virgo to revisit the cosmic-web structure around it. This work is the foundation of a series of papers that will investigate the multiwavelength properties of galaxies in the cosmic web around Virgo. We match spectroscopically confirmed sources from several databases and surveys including HyperLeda, NASA Sloan Atlas, NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database, and ALFALFA. The sample consists of ∼7000 galaxies. By exploiting a tomographic approach, we identify 13 filaments, spanning several megaparsecs in length. Long >17 h –1 Mpc filaments, tend to be thin (<1 h –1 Mpc in radius) and with a low-density contrast (<5), while shorter filaments show a larger scatter in their structural properties. Overall, we find that filaments are a transitioning environment between the field and cluster in terms of local densities, galaxy morphologies, and fraction of barred galaxies. Denser filaments have a higher fraction of early-type galaxies, suggesting that the morphology–density relation is already in place in the filaments, before galaxies fall into the cluster itself. We release the full catalog of galaxies around Virgo and their associated properties. 
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  3. ABSTRACT

    We present SAMI-H i, a survey of the atomic hydrogen content of 296 galaxies with integral field spectroscopy available from the SAMI Galaxy Survey. The sample spans nearly 4 dex in stellar mass ($M_\star = 10^{7.4}-10^{11.1}~ \rm M_\odot$), redshift z < 0.06, and includes new Arecibo observations of 153 galaxies, for which we release catalogues and H i spectra. We use these data to compare the rotational velocities obtained from optical and radio observations and to show how systematic differences affect the slope and scatter of the stellar-mass and baryonic Tully–Fisher relations. Specifically, we show that $\rm H\alpha$ rotational velocities measured in the inner parts of galaxies (1.3 effective radii in this work) systematically underestimate H i global measurements, with H i/$\rm H\alpha$ velocity ratios that increase at low stellar masses, where rotation curves are typically still rising and $\rm H\alpha$ measurements do not reach their plateau. As a result, the $\rm H\alpha$ stellar mass Tully–Fisher relation is steeper (when M⋆ is the independent variable) and has larger scatter than its H i counterpart. Interestingly, we confirm the presence of a small fraction of low-mass outliers of the $\rm H\alpha$ relation that are not present when H i velocity widths are used and are not explained by ‘aperture effects’. These appear to be highly disturbed systems for which $\rm H\alpha$ widths do not provide a reliable estimate of the rotational velocity. Our analysis reaffirms the importance of taking into account differences in velocity definitions as well as tracers used when interpreting offsets from the Tully–Fisher relation, at both low and high redshifts and when comparing with simulations.

     
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  5. This White Paper highlights the role Primarily Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs) play within the astronomy profession, addressing issues related to employment, resources and support, research opportunities and productivity, and educational and societal impacts. 
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  6. The NSF-sponsored Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team (UAT) is a collaborative, multifaceted program of faculty and undergraduate research at a consortium of 23 diverse U.S. institutions, founded to promote undergraduate research and faculty development within the extragalactic ALFALFA HI blind survey project and follow-up programs. The objective of the UAT is to provide opportunities for faculty and students from a wide range of public and private colleges and especially those with small astronomy programs to learn how science is accomplished in a large collaboration while contributing to the scientific goals of a legacy radio astronomy survey. Partnering with Arecibo and Green Bank Observatories, the UAT has worked with 334 undergraduates (40% women) and 32 (48% women) faculty in the past 10 years, offering annual workshops, observing runs, and research projects (academic year and sumer), and presentation of results at national meetings such as the AAS (at AAS233: Burhenne et al., Cane et al., Gault et al., Hetrick et al., Jong et al., Kumagai et al., Luna et al., Olivieri Villalvazo et al., Page et al., Poulin et al., Rea et al., Rehmn et al., Reiter et al., ). In this presentation, we summarize the UAT program and outcomes, highlight several current Team research efforts, including multiwavelength followup observations of ALFALFA sources, the UAT Collaborative Groups Project, and the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS), and suggest how our model could be applied to other legacy projects. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918/0902211, AST-075267/0903394, AST-0725380, AST-1211005, AST-1211683, and AST-1637339. 
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  7. The Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS) attempts to detect the infall of galaxies onto the Pisces-Perseus Supercluster (PPS). The ALFALFA survey has greatly augmented the known redshifts across the region. APPSS sources will complement the ALFALFA sources, with the goal of building a large enough sample to make a high confidence measurement of infall and backflow onto the PSS filament via peculiar velocity estimates from the Tully-Fisher (TFR) and Baryonic Tully-Fisher (BTFR) relations. APPSS galaxies are selected using photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), aimed to detect low-mass, nearby gas-rich objects below the ALFALFA detection limit. The L-band wide receiver at Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico is used to obtain a five-minute ON-OFF measurement for each galaxy. Since the candidate galaxy redshifts are unknown, the receiver and spectrograph system are used in a search mode that spans the expected frequencies of HI emission from PPS galaxies. We will describe the goals, target selection, and data reduction process for the survey. Our collaboration has divided the PPS into two-degree wide declination strips for data reduction; we report preliminary results for strips 23 and 33. We have made the initial data reduction on more than 200 targets, and determined the systemic velocity, line width, integrated flux density, and HI mass for each candidate detection. We will compare results on our two declination strips, and point out interesting detections found along the way as examples of the data reduction process. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-1211005 and AST-1637339. Publication: American Astronomical Society, AAS Meeting #233, id.356.07 Pub Date: January 2019 Bibcode: 2019AAS...23335607L 
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  8. The Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS) attempts to detect the infall of galaxies onto the Pisces-Perseus Supercluster (PPS). The ALFALFA survey has greatly augmented the known redshifts across the region. APPSS sources will complement the ALFALFA sources, with the goal of building a large enough sample to make a high confidence measurement of infall and backflow onto the PSS filament via peculiar velocity estimates from the Tully-Fisher (TFR) and Baryonic Tully-Fisher (BTFR) relations. APPSS galaxies are selected using photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), aimed to detect low-mass, nearby gas-rich objects below the ALFALFA detection limit. The L-band wide receiver at Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico is used to obtain a five-minute ON-OFF measurement for each galaxy. Since the candidate galaxy redshifts are unknown, the receiver and spectrograph system are used in a search mode that spans the expected frequencies of HI emission from PPS galaxies. We will describe the goals, target selection, and data reduction process for the survey. Our collaboration has divided the PPS into two-degree wide declination strips for data reduction; we report preliminary results for strips 23 and 33. We have made the initial data reduction on more than 200 targets, and determined the systemic velocity, line width, integrated flux density, and HI mass for each candidate detection. We will compare results on our two declination strips, and point out interesting detections found along the way as examples of the data reduction process. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-1211005 and AST-1637339. 
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  9. The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT) Groups project is a coordinated study of gas and star formation properties of galaxies in and around more than 50 nearby (z<0.03) groups and clusters of varied richness, morphological type mix, and X-ray luminosity. We aim to probe mechanisms of gas depletion and morphological transformation by considering the spatial distributions of star formation in galaxies inhabiting a wide range of group and cluster environments. Here we present recent results from our wide area Hα and broadband R imaging project carried out with the WIYN 0.9m+MOSAIC/HDI at KPNO. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005 and AST-1637339. 
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  10. The Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS) will provide strong observational constraints on the infall rate onto the main filament of the Pisces-Perseus Supercluster. The survey data consist of HI emission-line galaxies in the PPS region, obtained primarily at the Arecibo Observatory. Here we present data from Declination strips 27 and 29, which include 308 target galaxies, and describe our method for deducing the dark matter distribution in the filament from galaxy peculiar velocities by comparison to similar filaments in the Millennium simulation. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-1211005 and AST-1637339. 
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