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Creators/Authors contains: "Schroers, Jan"

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  1. Free, publicly-accessible full text available April 1, 2023
  2. Abstract

    The viscosity and its temperature dependence, the fragility, are key properties of a liquid. A low fragility is believed to promote the formation of metallic glasses. Yet, the fragility remains poorly understood, since experimental data of its compositional dependence are scarce. Here, we introduce the film inflation method (FIM), which measures the fragility of metallic glass forming liquids across wide ranges of composition and glass-forming ability. We determine the fragility for 170 alloys ranging over 25 at.% in Mg–Cu–Y. Within this alloy system, large fragility variations are observed. Contrary to the general understanding, a low fragility does not correlate with high glass-forming ability here. We introduce crystallization complexity as an additional contribution, which can potentially become significant when modeling glass forming ability over many orders of magnitude.

  3. Free, publicly-accessible full text available January 1, 2023
  4. Free, publicly-accessible full text available February 1, 2023
  5. Advancements in nanotechnology require the development of nanofabrication methods for a wide range of materials, length scales, and elemental distributions. Today’s nanofabrication methods are typically missing at least one demanded characteristic. Hence, a general method enabling versatile nanofabrication remains elusive. Here, we show that, when revealing and using the underlying mechanisms of thermomechanical nanomolding, a highly versatile nanofabrication toolbox is the result. Specifically, we reveal interface diffusion and dislocation slip as the controlling mechanisms and use their transition to control, combine, and predict the ability to fabricate general materials, material combinations, and length scales. Designing specific elemental distributions is based on the relative diffusivities, the transition temperature, and the distribution of the materials in the feedstock. The mechanistic origins of thermomechanical nanomolding and their homologous temperature-dependent transition suggest a versatile toolbox capable of combining many materials in nanostructures and potentially producing any material in moldable shapes on the nanoscale.
  6. Abstract

    Functional particles that respond to external stimuli are spurring technological evolution across various disciplines. While large-scale production of functional particles is needed for their use in real-life applications, precise control over particle shapes and directional properties has remained elusive for high-throughput processes. We developed a high-throughput emulsion-based process that exploits rapid vitrification of a thixotropic medium to manufacture diverse functional particles in large quantities. The vitrified medium renders stationary emulsion droplets that preserve their shape and size during solidification, and energetic fields can be applied to build programmed anisotropy into the particles. We showcase mass-production of several functional particles, including low-melting point metallic particles, self-propelling Janus particles, and unidirectionally-magnetized robotic particles, via this static-state particle fabrication process.