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  1. A cursory look at the Internet protocol stack shows error checking capability almost at every layer, and yet, a slowly growing set of results show that a surprising fraction of big data transfers over TCP/IP are failing. As we have dug into this problem, we have come to realize that nobody is paying much attention to the causes of transmission errors in the Internet. Rather, they have typically resorted to file-level retransmissions. Given the exponential growth in data sizes, this approach is not sustainable. Furthermore, while there has been considerable progress in understanding error codes and how to choose or create error codes that offer sturdy error protection, the Internet has not made use of this new science. We propose a set of new ideas that look at paths forward to reduce error rates and better protect big data. We also propose a new file transfer protocol that efficiently handles errors and minimizes retransmissions. 
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    Free, publicly-accessible full text available June 1, 2024
  2. Cities around the world are increasingly promoting electric vehicles (EV) to reduce and ultimately eliminate greenhouse gas emissions. A huge number of EVs will put unprecedented stress on the power grid. To efficiently serve the increased charging load, these EVs need to be charged in a coordinated fashion. One promising coordination strategy is vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) charging coordination, enabling EVs to sell their surplus energy in an ad-hoc, peer to peer manner. This paper introduces an Information Centric Networking (ICN)-based protocol to support ad-hoc V2V charging coordination (V2V-CC). Our evaluations demonstrate that V2V-CC can provide added flexibility, fault tolerance, and reduced communication latency than a conventional centralized cloud based approach. We show that V2V-CC can achieve a 93% reduction in protocol completion time compared to a conventional approach. We also show that V2V-CC also works well under extreme packet loss, making it ideal for V2V charging coordination. 
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  3. Weather sensing and forecasting has become increasingly accurate in the last decade thanks to high-resolution radars, efficient computational algorithms, and high-performance computing facilities. Through a distributed and federated network of radars, scientists can make high-resolution observations of the weather conditions on a scale that benefits public safety, commerce, transportation, and other fields. While weather radars are critical infrastructure, they are often located in remote areas with poor network connectivity. Data retrieved from these radars are often delayed or lost, or even lack proper synchronization, resulting in sub-optimal weather prediction. This work applies Named Data Networking (NDN) to a federation of weather sensing radars for efficient content addressing and retrieval. We identify weather data based on a hierarchical naming scheme that allows us to explicitly access desired files. We demonstrate that compared to the window-based mechanism in TCP/IP, an NDN based mechanism improves data quality, reduces uncertainty, and enhances weather prediction. 
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  4. As in-vehicle communication becomes more complex, the automotive community is exploring various architectural options such as centralized and zonal architectures for their numerous benefits. Common characteristics of these architectures include the need for high-bandwidth communication and security, which have been elusive with standard automotive architectures. Further, as automotive communication technologies evolve, it is also likely that multiple link-layer technologies such as CAN and Automotive Ethernet will co-exist. These alternative architectures promise to integrate these diverse sets of technologies. However, architectures that allow such co-existence have not been adequately explored. In this work we explore a new network architecture called Named Data Networking (NDN) to achieve multiple goals: provide a foundational security infrastructure and bridge different link layer protocols such as CAN, LIN, and automotive Ethernet into a unified communication system. We have created a proof-of-concept bench-top testbed using CAN HATS and Raspberry PIs that replay real traffic over CAN and Ethernet to demonstrate how NDN can provide a secure, high-speed bridge between different automotive link layers. We also show how NDN can support communication between centralized or zonal high-power compute components. Security is achieved through digitally signing all Data packets between these components, preventing unauthorized ECUs from injecting arbitrary data into the network. We also demonstrate NDN's ability to prevent DoS and replay attacks between different network segments connected through NDN. 
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  5. With live video streaming becoming accessible in various applications on all client platforms, it is imperative to create a seamless and efficient distribution system that is flexible enough to choose from multiple Internet architectures best suited for video streaming (live, on-demand, AR). In this paper, we highlight the benefits of such a hybrid system for live video streaming as well as present a detailed analysis with the goal to provide a high quality of experience (QoE) for the viewer. For our hybrid architecture, video streaming is supported simultaneously over TCP/IP and Named Data Networking (NDN)-based architecture via operating system and networking virtualization techniques to design a flexible system that utilizes the benefits of these varying Internet architectures. Also, to relieve users from the burden of installing a new protocol stack (in the case of NDN) on their devices, we developed a lightweight solution in the form of a container that includes the network stack as well as the streaming application. At the client, the required Internet architecture (TCP/IP versus NDN) can be selected in a transparent and adaptive manner. Based on a prototype, we have designed and implemented maintaining efficient use of network resources, we demonstrate that in the case of live streaming, NDN achieves better QoE per client than IP and can also utilize higher than allocated bandwidth through in-network caching. Even without caching, as opposed to IP-only, our hybrid setup achieves better average bitrate and better perceived visual quality (computed via VMAF metric) over live video streaming services. Furthermore, we present detailed analysis on ways adaptive video streaming with NDN can be further improved with respect to QoE. 
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  6. With live video streaming becoming accessible in various applications on all client platforms, it is imperative to create a seamless and efficient distribution system that is flexible enough to choose from multiple Internet architectures best suited for video streaming (live, on-demand, AR). In this paper, we highlight the benefits of such a hybrid system for live video streaming as well as present a detailed analysis with the goal to provide a high quality of experience (QoE) for the viewer. For our hybrid architecture, video streaming is supported simultaneously over TCP/IP and Named Data Networking (NDN)-based architecture via operating system and networking virtualization techniques to design a flexible system that utilizes the benefits of these varying internet architectures. Also, to relieve users from the burden of installing a new protocol stack (in the case of NDN) on their devices, we developed a lightweight solution in the form of a container that includes the network stack as well as the streaming application. At the client, the required Internet architecture (TCP/IP versus NDN) can be selected in a transparent and adaptive manner. Based on a prototype we have designed and implemented maintaining efficient use of network resources, we demonstrate that in the case of live streaming, NDN achieves better QoE per client than IP and can also utilize higher than allocated bandwidth through in-network caching. Even without caching, our hybrid setup achieves better average bitrate over live video streaming services than its IP-only alternative. Furthermore, we present detailed analysis on ways adaptive video streaming with NDN can be further improved with respect to QoE. 
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  7. null (Ed.)
    In today's era of Internet of Things (IoT), where massive amounts of data are produced by IoT and other devices, edge computing has emerged as a prominent paradigm for low-latency data processing. However, applications may have diverse latency requirements: certain latency-sensitive processing operations may need to be performed at the edge, while delay-tolerant operations can be performed on the cloud, without occupying the potentially limited edge computing resources. To achieve that, we envision an environment where computing resources are distributed across edge and cloud offerings. In this paper, we present the design of CLEDGE (CLoud + EDGE), an information-centric hybrid cloud-edge framework, aiming to maximize the on-time completion of computational tasks offloaded by applications with diverse latency requirements. The design of CLEDGE is motivated by the networking challenges that mixed reality researchers face. Our evaluation demonstrates that CLEDGE can complete on-time more than 90% of offloaded tasks with modest overheads. 
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  8. null (Ed.)