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Title: Vehicle-to-Vehicle Charging Coordination over Information Centric Networking
Cities around the world are increasingly promoting electric vehicles (EV) to reduce and ultimately eliminate greenhouse gas emissions. A huge number of EVs will put unprecedented stress on the power grid. To efficiently serve the increased charging load, these EVs need to be charged in a coordinated fashion. One promising coordination strategy is vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) charging coordination, enabling EVs to sell their surplus energy in an ad-hoc, peer to peer manner. This paper introduces an Information Centric Networking (ICN)-based protocol to support ad-hoc V2V charging coordination (V2V-CC). Our evaluations demonstrate that V2V-CC can provide added flexibility, fault tolerance, and reduced communication latency than a conventional centralized cloud based approach. We show that V2V-CC can achieve a 93% reduction in protocol completion time compared to a conventional approach. We also show that V2V-CC also works well under extreme packet loss, making it ideal for V2V charging coordination.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2126148 2019163 2019012
NSF-PAR ID:
10408418
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
IEEE LCN
Page Range / eLocation ID:
363 to 366
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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