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  1. Game map interfaces provide an alternative perspective on the worlds players inhabit.compared to navigation applications popular in day-to-day life, game maps have different affordances to match players' situated goals. To contextualize and understand these differences and how they developed, we present a historical chronicle of game map interfaces. Starting from how games came to involve maps, we trace how maps are first separate from the game, becoming more and more integrated into play until converging in smartphone-style interfaces. We synthesize several game history texts with critical engagement with 123 key games to develop this map-focused chronicle, from which we highlight trends and opportunities for future map designs. Our work contributes a record of trends in game map interfaces that can serve as a source of reference and inspiration to game designers, digital physical-world map designers, and game scholars. 
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  2. With idle games, active withdrawal from the game comprises an essential part of gameplay as players wait for the game state to change over time. This mode of interaction is paradigmatic for the change of roles technologies have in our lives. However, the design elements of idle games are less well understood, particularly from the perspectives of developers. We interviewed six designers of six different popular idle games and inquired into their individual approaches. Via thematic analysis, we refine and expand on existing definitions of idle games as a genre, shed light on ethically charged practices of care in their design, and identify shared core characteristics between the games and processes. We then generate intermediate-level knowledge on the design of idle games. Our work contributes designers' perspectives on idle games and their design to a growing body of literature on the genre. 
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  3. Our objective is to explore distributed forms of creativity that arise in play to help guide and foster supportive research, game design, and technology. This workshop seeks to bring together researchers, game designers, and others to examine theories of creativity and play, game design practices, methods for studying creativity in play, and creative play experiences. Participants will present work, video prototype, discuss topics, and contribute to outcomes. 
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  4. Collaborative mixed reality games enable shared social experiences, in which players interact with the physical and virtual game environment, and with other players in real-time. Recent advances in technology open a range of opportunities for designing new and innovative collaborative mixed reality games, but also raise questions around design, technical requirements, immersion, safety, and player experience. This workshop seeks to bring together researchers, designers, practitioners, and players to identify the most pressing challenges that need to be addressed in the next decade, discuss opportunities to overcome these challenges, and highlight lessons learned from past designs of such games. Participants will present their ideas, assemble and discuss a collection of related papers, outline a unifying research agenda, and engage in an outdoor game ideation and prototyping session. We anticipate that the CSCW community can contribute to designing the next generation of collaborative mixed reality games and technologies and to support the growth of research and development in this exciting and emerging area. 
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  5. Embodied design methods are gaining popularity among design researchers. They leverage the physical and situated experience of designers to access and better understand present and future situations, humans, and design opportunities. Here, we propose a workshop to learn about, engage with, and discuss larping (live action role playing) as an embodied design research method, in particular as: i) a sensitizing activity prior to design; and ii) a test-bed to investigate and further iterate design concepts and prototypes. The workshop is organized by design research experts in embodied design methods and larps, and it is aimed at those interested in embodied design methods, with or without experience with larps. Insights from the workshop will be captured in a joint article extending current embodied design methods. 
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