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  1. Collaborative data analytics is becoming increasingly important due to the higher complexity of data science, more diverse skills from different disciplines, more common asynchronous schedules of team members, and the global trend of working remotely. In this demo we will show how Texera supports this emerging computing paradigm to achieve high productivity among collaborators with various backgrounds. Based on our active joint projects on the system, we use a scenario of social media analysis to show how a data science task can be conducted on a user friendly yet powerful platform by a multi-disciplinary team including domain scientists with limited coding skills and experienced machine learning experts. We will present how to do collaborative editing of a workflow and collaborative execution of the workflow in Texera. We will focus on data-centric features such as synchronization of operator schemas among the users during the construction phase, and monitoring and controlling the shared runtime during the execution phase. 
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  2. We will demonstrate a prototype query-processing engine, which utilizes correlations among predicates to accelerate machine learning (ML) inference queries on unstructured data. Expensive operators such as feature extractors and classifiers are deployed as user-defined functions (UDFs), which are not penetrable by classic query optimization techniques such as predicate push-down. Recent optimization schemes (e.g., Probabilistic Predicates or PP) build a cheap proxy model for each predicate offline, and inject proxy models in the front of expensive ML UDFs under the independence assumption in queries. Input records that do not satisfy query predicates are filtered early by proxy models to bypass ML UDFs. But enforcing the independence assumption may result in sub-optimal plans. We use correlative proxy models to better exploit predicate correlations and accelerate ML queries. We will demonstrate our query optimizer called CORE, which builds proxy models online, allocates parameters to each model, and reorders them. We will also show end-to-end query processing with or without proxy models. 
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  3. We consider accelerating machine learning (ML) inference queries on unstructured datasets. Expensive operators such as feature extractors and classifiers are deployed as user-defined functions (UDFs), which are not penetrable with classic query optimization techniques such as predicate push-down. Recent optimization schemes (e.g., Probabilistic Predicates or PP) assume independence among the query predicates, build a proxy model for each predicate offline, and rewrite a new query by injecting these cheap proxy models in the front of the expensive ML UDFs. In such a manner, unlikely inputs that do not satisfy query predicates are filtered early to bypass the ML UDFs. We show that enforcing the independence assumption in this context may result in sub-optimal plans. In this paper, we propose CORE, a query optimizer that better exploits the predicate correlations and accelerates ML inference queries. Our solution builds the proxy models online for a new query and leverages a branch-and-bound search process to reduce the building costs. Results on three real-world text, image and video datasets show that CORE improves the query throughput by up to 63% compared to PP and up to 80% compared to running the queries as it is. 
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